Advertisement
  1. Health

Varying exercise routine spurs fitness, alleviates boredom

Published Sep. 24, 2013

re you becoming bored with your exercise routine, maybe even noticing that your body doesn't seem to be making any progress? Boredom can wreak havoc with exercise commitment vows, and it's very easy to become bored when you fall into an exercise rut, continually repeating the same exercise movements over and over. When this happens, your body begins to get used to the exercise, and within six to eight weeks, muscular adaptation takes place.

This is not to suggest there is anything wrong with following a consistent, repetitive routine. Some people are content to remain at their current level. However, to stimulate progress and maximize your workout both physically and mentally, you need to spice up your workout routine by changing it up.

Variations to add to workout

1Changing sequence: Mixing up the order of the exercises every several weeks invites a fresh training stimulus.

2Vary intensity: Introduce interval workouts. Alternating high-intensity bursts of exercise with recovery periods will boost the calorie burn.

3Upbeat music: Good for cardio workouts. Keeping in tempo with the beat encourages you to change your pace frequently. A study from the Research Institute for Sport and Exercise found that people on stationary bikes cycled faster and covered more distance when faster music was playing.

4Compound exercises: Isolation exercises are when you train only one major muscle group at a time. Compound exercises engage multimuscle groups, such as a squat, which targets many muscles in the lower body and core.

5Cross-training: Performing different activities will provide new challenges, as you will be using your body in many different ways.

6Change equipment: Introduce stability balls, medicine balls, jump ropes, resistance bands, body cords, body bars and balance boards.

If you are 50 or older and have not been exercising, check with your physician before beginning any exercise program. Trainer Sally Anderson is happy to hear from readers but cannot respond to individual queries. She can be reached at slafit@tampabay.rr.com.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Stephanie Vold, a medical assistant and intake specialist for OnMed, holds the door while Austin White, president and CEO of the company, talks with a nurse practitioner during a demonstration of their new telehealth system at Tampa General Hospital on Tuesday. The hospital is the first to deploy the OnMed station and plans to install them at other locations. OCTAVIO JONES  |  Times
    The closet-size “office” with a life-size screen is another example of the changing face of medicine.
  2. Marijuana plants grow in a greenhouse environment in this room at the Curaleaf Homestead Cultivation Facility. This environment controls the amount of natural sunlight and artificial light the plants are exposed to, as well as the temperature. EMILY MICHOT  |  Miami Herald
    An Atlanta broker is listing one license for $40 million and the other for $55 million.
  3. A page from the Medicare Handbook focuses on Medicare Advantage plans, which have become increasingly popular in recent years. Medicare's open enrollment period for 2020 begins Oct. 15 and lasts through Dec. 7. PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS  |  AP
    New benefits are giving an extra boost to Medicare Advantage, the already popular alternative to traditional Medicare.
  4. The Tampa Bay Times' annual Medicare Guide explains how the program is set up, helps you compare options available in the Tampa Bay area, and points the way toward help, including free, one-on-one assistance. This illustration will grace the cover of LifeTimes on Oct. 23, when the guide will be published in print. RON BORRESEN  |  Tampa Bay Times
    As the open enrollment period begins, it’s time to review your coverage.
  5. The Medicare Handbook for 2020 is a good resource to have as the annual open enrollment period gets under way. The government usually mails beneficiaries a copy. Find a PDF version to print at medicare.gov/pub/medicare-you-handbook, or call 1-800-633-4227 (1-800-MEDICARE) to order a copy. THOMAS TOBIN  |  Tampa Bay Times
    The open enrollment period, which lasts into December, is a time for millions of beneficiaries to review, and possibly change, their coverage.
  6. Medicare's online Plan Finder has been redesigned and is available at medicare.gov/find-a-plan. THOMAS TOBIN  |  Tampa Bay Times
    The most-used tool on Medicare.gov will look different this year.
  7. Jim Tolbert, left, staffs a booth at a senior expo for Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders, or SHINE, a state program that answers Medicare and other insurance questions. The program has scheduled a number of events around the Tampa Bay area during Medicare's open enrollment period, Oct. 15 to Dec. 7. Times (2015)
    About 500 volunteers statewide are at the ready. They work for Serving Health Insurance Needs of Elders, or SHINE, now in its 28th year.
  8. In this Sept. 6, 2019, photo, Donna Cryer holds up family photos that include her father Roland Henry, as she poses for a photo in Washington. When her father died, she tried to donate his organs, yet the local organ collection agency said no, without talking to the family or providing a reason. "It was devastating to be told there was nothing they considered worthy of donation. Nada. Not a kidney, not a liver, not tissue,” recalled Donna Cryer, president of the nonprofit Global Liver Institute and herself a recipient of a liver transplant. SUSAN WALSH  |  AP
    Under U.S. transplant rules, the country is divided into 58 zones, each assigned an “organ procurement organization” in charge of donation at death.
  9. Kreshae Humphrey, 26, bathes her daughter, Nevaeh Soto De Jesus, 3, inside of a baby bath tub in the middle of their living room. The parents bathe all three of their girls with bottled water because they believe the children were sickened by the tap water at the Southern Comfort mobile home park off U.S. 19 in Clearwater. The family is suing the park's owner over the issue, but the owner and the state say there are no problems with the drinking water there. MARTHA ASENCIO-RHINE  |  Times
    The owner of Southern Comfort denies there are problems with the drinking water. But the park is still being shut down. All families must be out by Oct. 31.
  10. An arm of the Department of Health and Human Services is taking steps to establish a National Volunteer Care Corps that would recruit healthy retirees and young adults to help seniors live independently. The ranks of Americans age 85 and up are set to swell to 14.6 million in 2040, up from more than 6 million now. Times (2010)
    A federal agency is exploring a national volunteer program modeled after the Peace Corps to help care for the booming elderly population.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement