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Family speaks out about life of Riverview man, 88, killed by deputy

The statement thanks people for support and praises law enforcement, but also accuses the media and the public of rushing to judgment.
The family of Ronald Ehrich, an 88-year-old Riverview man who was shot to death by a Hillsborough County Sheriff’s deputy Tuesday morning, issued a statement on Thursday.
The family of Ronald Ehrich, an 88-year-old Riverview man who was shot to death by a Hillsborough County Sheriff’s deputy Tuesday morning, issued a statement on Thursday. [ Ronald Ehrich family ]
Published Dec. 9, 2021|Updated Dec. 9, 2021

The family of Ronald Ehrich, an 88-year-old Riverview man who was shot to death by a Hillsborough County Sheriff’s deputy Tuesday morning, issued a statement on Thursday.

The full statement, sent to a Tampa Bay Times reporter from Ehrich’s daughter in a Facebook message, appears below just as it was written.

“First of all, we would like to say we are thankful to everyone who knows us and knows our father for reaching out and supporting us. It means everything and we are so thankful for you.

“Tuesday morning was a tragedy many levels, and everything since has been unimaginable. We are just now beginning to process our grief, and just getting through the logistics of his passing.

“At the same time we are trying to keep our own lives and responsibilities functioning. Anyone who has lost someone they care about knows how incredibly hard this whole process is. On top of this, our family has to process, learn, comprehend, and try to sort out the aftermath of the manner in which he died.

“We want everyone to know are fully cooperating with the HCSO and the FDLE and they are cooperating with us. Everyone we have dealt with so far has been polite, caring and professional.

“When the Sheriff gave his first press conference almost immediately after the incident, it was only what he knew about the situation so far, an unfolding investigation that will take a long time to sort out.

“No one knew my father was a sane, kind, happy man who had a great life on his own terms. No one knew he had family, friends and neighbors that loved him, and even if we did not see each other every day, we were in constant contact. No one knew that he had just been out with my brother the day before the incident and was looking forward to Christmas at my house. No one knew he was invited to move closer so we could see him more, but chose to stay because he loved his house, as it was his connection to his wife that passed away. No one knew he was perfectly capable of taking care of himself, drove, shopped, cooked, cleaned, did laundry and made his bed and finished a crossword every morning. No one knew he was a heavy sleeper with 60 percent hearing loss and could barely hear with his hearing aids — which were still on his nightstand at the time this incident. No one knew he needed glasses that he also was not wearing, and had even had some recent macular degeneration. No one knew that he was trained and licensed and knew fully well the rules of how and when to raise a gun at someone. No one knew he was also an ex-policeman with an excellent record of service, who was on high alert because there had just been a break in at the house right next door just before this incident. No one knew he was probably thinking he was catching the neighborhood burglar.

“No one knew any of these things about him, and yet there was an immediate press and social media windstorm that has made our personal tragedy a public circus. Our family and especially my father support(ed) law enforcement and first responders, and are thankful for the work they do every day. If you think it’s easy for one minute to go into the situations they do, make life or death decisions in the heat of the moment, respond to tragic situations like this, listen as families sob and hug their loved one’s pillow, etc. it’s not. It’s gut wrenching all around.

“My father told me many of his own stories. It’s not easy. If you think you could do better then sign up and prove it. The media and the public need to realize that these are real people involved in a surreal and impossible situation — and stop rushing to judgment of the police, the victim, or the family of a victim before the complete story comes out.

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“And even then why does everyone in this world need to judge? We live in a world where media sensationalism sells, and commenting on Facebook is a competitive sport. It’s ridiculous and hurtful. No one’s opinion without facts is helping anything right now. Instead of getting involved with something that has nothing to do with you, go be kind to another person today.

“Ron Ehrich was someone’s husband, father, grandfather, uncle, brother, son, neighbor. He loved all of us, and we loved him, and this situation is incredibly hard to handle. People should learn to respect that. Everyone should stop inflating the story, let the investigation finish, let us bury our father, and let us grieve in peace. Nothing can bring him back.”

Ronald Ehrich is pictured in a Facebook post from 2018. Ehrich was fatally shot by a Hillsborough sheriff's deputy who'd been called to check on him on Tuesday.
Ronald Ehrich is pictured in a Facebook post from 2018. Ehrich was fatally shot by a Hillsborough sheriff's deputy who'd been called to check on him on Tuesday. [ Facebook ]
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