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Photo gallery: Terri Schiavo - Quiet center of a turbulent storm

March 27, 2005 - After working her third 12-hour waitress shift in as many days, Cecily Pond, 29, reads signs at the vigil for Terri Schiavo outside Woodside Hospice about 4 a.m. Easter Sunday. She said she felt she had to come because her son requested that she bring Terri Schiavo his favorite stuffed animal. "He doesn't understand how we can hurt people when we're not allowed to hurt animals. And I don't know how to explain it to him," she said. [Cherie Diez | Times]
March 27, 2005 - After working her third 12-hour waitress shift in as many days, Cecily Pond, 29, reads signs at the vigil for Terri Schiavo outside Woodside Hospice about 4 a.m. Easter Sunday. She said she felt she had to come because her son requested that she bring Terri Schiavo his favorite stuffed animal. "He doesn't understand how we can hurt people when we're not allowed to hurt animals. And I don't know how to explain it to him," she said. [Cherie Diez | Times]
Published Mar. 31, 2015

10 years ago, on March 31, 2005, Terri Schiavo died at Hospice House Woodside in Pinellas Park. Her passing, to all appearances a peaceful one, brought to a close her unwitting role in a lengthy legal battle that pitted Terri Schiavo's parents against her husband, Michael, who wanted to remove the feeding tube that kept her alive in a persistent vegetative state. In 2003, then Governor Jeb Bush intervened to have Schiavo's feeding tube reinserted after it had been removed. From 1990 until her death in 2005, Schiavo never regained consciousness.

Shortly after Terri Schiavo's death, Times staff writer Anita Kumar wrote about visiting Schiavo in 2000. She was the last reporter Michael Schiavo allowed inside Terri's room.

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