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CEOs speak out on gun violence, want Congressional action

In a letter sent to the Senate on Thursday, CEOs from businesses including Airbnb, Twitter and Uber asked Congress to pass a bill to require background checks on all gun sales.
FILE - In this April 14, 2018 file photo, a man wears an unloaded pistol during a pro gun-rights rally in Austin, Texas. In a letter sent to the Senate on Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, CEOs from businesses including Airbnb, Twitter and Uber asked Congress to pass a bill to require background checks on all gun sales and a strong red flag law that would allow courts to issue life-saving extreme risk protection orders. [ERIC GAY | AP]
Published Sep. 12

Associated Press

The CEOs of more than 100 companies are stepping into the nation's gun debate, imploring Congress to expand background checks and enact a strong "red flag" law.

In a letter sent to the Senate on Thursday, CEOs from businesses including Airbnb, Twitter and Uber asked Congress to pass a bill to require background checks on all gun sales and a strong red flag law that would allow courts to issue life-saving extreme risk protection orders.

The country's law on background checks needs to be updated, the CEOs argued, saying the current law doesn't reflect how people buy guns today.

The New York Times was first to report on the letter.

The CEOs' letter comes after shootings at a Walmart in El Paso, Texas, as well as those in West Texas and Dayton, Ohio.

RELATED: What do Florida lawmakers plan to do about gun violence this time?

Walmart earlier this month decided to discontinue sales of certain gun ammunition and also will discontinue handgun sales in Alaska.

The retailer is further requesting that customers refrain from openly carrying firearms at its Walmart and Sam's Club stores unless they are law enforcement officers. However, it said that it won't be changing its policy for customers who have permits for concealed carry. Walmart says it will be adding signage in stores to inform customers of those changes.

Other retailers including Walgreens and Kroger have followed suit, with Publix — Florida's largest supermarket chain — announcing Thursday it is also asking customers not to openly carry firearms in its stores.

Senators, who returned from recess this week, are pushing to require background checks for private gun sales and made a fresh pitch to President Donald Trump on Wednesday as part of an effort to break the gridlock over legislation to curb gun violence following a summer of more mass shootings.

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