Advertisement
  1. News
  2. /
  3. Nation & World

Justice Department files lawsuit against Edward Snowden over memoir

Snowden published his book, “Permanent Record,” without submitting it for a pre-publication review.
Snowden published his book, “Permanent Record,” without submitting it for a pre-publication review, in violation of non-disclosure agreements he signed with both the NSA and the Central Intelligence Agency, the Justice Department alleges. [Image by Archive]
Snowden published his book, “Permanent Record,” without submitting it for a pre-publication review, in violation of non-disclosure agreements he signed with both the NSA and the Central Intelligence Agency, the Justice Department alleges. [Image by Archive]
Published Sep. 17, 2019
Updated Sep. 17, 2019

Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S. government filed a lawsuit Tuesday against former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, alleging he violated nondisclosure agreements by publishing a memoir without giving the government an opportunity to review it first.

The Justice Department is seeking to "recover all proceeds" from Snowden's book, which was released Tuesday.

Snowden published his book, “Permanent Record,” without submitting it for a pre-publication review, in violation of non-disclosure agreements he signed with both the NSA and the Central Intelligence Agency, the Justice Department alleges.

In his memoir, Snowden tells his life story in detail for the first time and explains why he chose to risk his freedom to become perhaps the most famous whistleblower of all time. It offers an expansive account of how he came to reveal secret details about the government's mass collection of emails, phone calls and Internet activity in the name of national security.

Snowden was charged under the U.S. Espionage Act. He now lives in Russia in order to avoid arrest.

"The United States' ability to protect sensitive national security information depends on employees' and contractors' compliance with their non-disclosure agreements, including their pre-publication review obligations," Assistant Attorney General Jody Hunt said in a statement. "We will not permit individuals to enrich themselves, at the expense of the United States, without complying with their pre-publication review obligations."

The Justice Department is not attempting to limit the book’s distribution but is asking a federal judge to allow the government to collect all the proceeds from the book. The book’s publisher was also named in the lawsuit. The government is suing the publisher to ensure that no funds are transferred to Snowden while the case plays out, the Justice Department said.

Snowden’s attorney did not immediately comment on the lawsuit.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

  1. Experts recommend employers outline policies about teleworking, travel and sick leave; monitor recommendations from the CDC and local health officials; and stock up on needed office supplies and other products that might be affected by a global manufacturing slowdown. [Times (2001)]
  2. In this photo made available by the Florida Highway patrol shows confiscated drugs following the arrest of two men Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020, Santa Rosa County, Fla. Authorities confiscated methamphetamine, cocaine and fentanyl. (Florida Highway Patrol via AP) [AP]
  3. Trader Peter Mazza works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) [CRAIG RUTTLE  |  AP]
  4. Brian Baumgartner, who played Kevin on "the Office," partnered with Bush's Beans to bring the chili his character was famous for spilling to life. [Bush's Beans]
  5. Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., speaks during a news conference about the "Emmett Till Antilynching Act" which would designate lynching as a hate crime under federal law, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday. Emmett Till, pictured at right, was a 14-year-old African-American who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955, after being accused of offending a white woman in her family's grocery store. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) [J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE  |  AP]
  6. Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, center, speaks during a meeting of a task force on the new coronavirus at his official residence in Tokyo Thursday. Abe was asking all elementary, middle and high schools to remain shut until spring holidays begin in late March. (Kyodo News via AP) [菅原善孝  |  AP]
  7. One or more people have been using fake cash to buy Girl Scout cookies, leaving troops in the Bradenton area out hundreds of dollars, according to news reports. [JUAN CARLOS CHAVEZ  |  CENTRO Tampa]
  8. Guests walk down Main Street with Cinderella's Castle in the background at Magic Kingdom in Orlando in this 2019 file photo. Walt Disney World told some cast members to stay home because of their recent trip to Italy and the possibility of coronavirus infection.
  9. President Donald Trump, with members of the president's coronavirus task force, speaks during a news conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Wednesday in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) [EVAN VUCCI  |  AP]
  10. In this June 28, 2018, file photo, a police officer stands guard outside The New York Times building in New York. The campaign to reelect President Donald Trump sued The New York Times for defamation Wednesday, saying it was responsible for an essay by a former executive editor for the newspaper that claimed the campaign made a deal with Russian officials to defeat Hillary Clinton in 2016. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File) [MARY ALTAFFER  |  AP]
  11. Police respond to reports of an active shooting at the Molson Coors Brewing Co. campus in Milwaukee on Wednesday [MORRY GASH  |  Associated Press]
  12. This 2007 image released by G.P. Putnam's Sons shows author Clive Cussler riding in a classic car. Cussler died on Monday at his home in Scottsdale, AZ. He was 88. [UNKNOWN  |  Ronnie Bramhall/G.P. Putnam's Sons via AP]
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement