Advertisement
  1. News
  2. /
  3. Nation & World

51 % of the U.S. want Trump’s impeachment, removal from office: Fox News

Several polls published since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the start of an impeachment inquiry on Sept. 24 show a shift in views.
President Donald Trump speaks during an event on "transparency in Federal guidance and enforcement" in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019, in Washington. Americans are following the impeachment inquiry closely _ and are now slightly more likely to approve than disapprove of the inquiry while more closely split over whether Trump should be removed from office. [EVAN VUCCI | AP]
Published Oct. 10
Updated Oct. 10

WASHINGTON — Americans are following impeachment proceedings closely and are slightly more likely to approve than disapprove of the inquiry itself. But the public is more closely split over whether President Donald Trump should be removed from office.

Several polls published since House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced the start of an impeachment inquiry on Sept. 24 show a shift in views from earlier this year as the House of Representatives investigates whether Trump violated his oath of office in asking the government of Ukraine to investigate a political opponent.

WHERE THINGS STAND

Polls find support for impeachment has shifted significantly from earlier this year. The public is now more closely divided after earlier polls showed majority opposition to impeachment.

A Fox News poll conducted Sunday through Tuesday found 51% of Americans now say Trump should be impeached and removed from office, up from 42% who said that in July.

Likewise, a Washington Post-Schar School survey conducted in early October shows 58% of Americans are supportive of the decision by Congress to initiate an inquiry, including 49% who say Congress was right to begin an investigation and should also take the next step to remove Trump from office. Earlier this year, Post-ABC polls found less than half saying Congress should begin impeachment proceedings.

And polls show that the shift was closely tied to Pelosi's announcement of the inquiry. An early October poll from Quinnipiac University finds 45% of voters say Trump should be impeached and removed from office, up from 37% in a poll conducted immediately before that announcement.

___

CONSISTENT (AND POLARIZED) VIEWS OF TRUMP

Approval of Trump's overall performance has remained steady, as it has over the course of his presidency. The Quinnipiac poll shows Trump's approval rating standing at 40%, where it was in its poll conducted just before the inquiry began.

But, as with most political issues in today’s environment, views of the Republican president and impeachment are intensely polarized. A wide share of Democrats express support for impeachment, while the vast majority of Republicans stand opposed.

___

PRECEDENT

Today's presidential impeachment inquiry is only the fourth in U.S. history, and polling demonstrates different scenarios for how opinion has changed as impeachment proceedings proceeded.

While opinions of President Bill Clinton and support for his removal from office moved slightly throughout 1998 and 1999, he emerged largely unscathed. According to polling by Gallup, support for Clinton's removal reached no more than about a third of Americans throughout impeachment proceedings over Clinton's handling of allegations of his extramarital affair with Monica Lewinsky, a White House intern. Before, during and after the impeachment process, Clinton's job approval was much higher than that of Trump.

By comparison, approval ratings for President Richard Nixon took a severe hit as the public learned more about his transgressions, according to Gallup polling. At the same time, support for impeachment steadily grew.

Even so, far less than half supported Nixon’s removal from office throughout 1973 and into 1974; it wasn’t until after the House Judiciary Committee passed articles of impeachment in late July that more than half held that view.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. FILE - In this Friday, Oct. 4, 2019 file photo, Defense Secretary Mark Esper speaks to a gathering of soldiers at the University Club at the University of Louisville in Louisville, Ky. Esper says during a weekend trip to the Middle East that under the current plan all U.S. troops leaving Syria will go to western Iraq, and that the military will continue to conduct operations against the Islamic State group to prevent a resurgence in that country. As Esper left Washington on Saturday, Oct. 19, U.S. troops were continuing to pull out of northern Syria after Turkey's invasion into the border region. TIMOTHY D. EASLEY  |  AP
    Esper emphasized that the proposal to leave a small number of troops in eastern Syria was intended to give the president “maneuver room” and wasn’t final.
  2. FILE - In this Thursday, April 18, 2019, file photo, a sign for the Department of Justice hangs in the press briefing room at the Justice Department, in Washington. PATRICK SEMANSKY  |  AP
    The official said the rules would not apply to legal permanent residents or anyone entering the U.S. legally, and children under 14 are exempt.
  3. This Oct. 20, 2019 image made from video by Twitter user @AthenaRising shows the tornado in Rockwall, TX. The National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down in Dallas on Sunday night, causing structural damage and knocking out electricity to thousands. (@AthenaRising via AP) @ATHENARISING  |  AP
    Three people were hospitalized and evaluated for non-life-threatening injuries.
  4. Two large cranes from the Hard Rock Hotel construction collapse come crashing down after being detonated for implosion in New Orleans, Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019. Officials set off thundering explosions Sunday to topple two cranes looming precariously over a partially collapsed hotel in New Orleans, but most of one crane appeared to be left dangling atop the ruined building while the other crashed down. STAFF PHOTO BY DAVID GRUNFELD  |  AP
    “We know that we are safer now than we have been in the past eight days,” said Mayor LaToya Cantrell.
  5. American military convoy stops near the town of Tel Tamr, north Syria, Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019. Kurdish-led fighters and Turkish-backed forces clashed sporadically Sunday in northeastern Syria amid efforts to work out a Kurdish evacuation from a besieged border town, the first pull-back under the terms of a U.S.-brokered cease-fire. BADERKHAN AHMAD  |  AP
    They aren’t coming home and the United States isn’t leaving the turbulent Middle East, according to current plans outlined by U.S. Defense Secretary Mark Esper.
  6. White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney announces that the G7 will be held at Trump National Doral, Thursday, Oct. 17, 2019, in Washington. EVAN VUCCI  |  AP
    Mulvaney said Trump “still considers himself to be in the hospitality business.”
  7. FILE - This June 2, 2017, file image made from video shows the Trump National Doral in Doral, Fla. President Donald Trump said on Twitter on Saturday, Oct. 19, 2019, he is reversing his plan to hold the next Group of Seven world leaders' meeting at his Doral, Florida, golf resort. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz, File) ALEX SANZ  |  AP
    The chief of staff called Trump’s sudden change of course — announced by the president on Twitter Saturday evening — “the right decision.”
  8. An Army carry team transfers the remains of Staff Sgt. Aaron R. Butler at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware on Friday. Butler died Wednesday of injuries sustained from an IED in Afghanistan.
    The soldiers were with the 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team and were in a Bradley fighting vehicle. They were not immediately identified.
  9. Move over, Honeycrisp: New apple to debut at grocery stores
  10. Brooklyn-based product design company MSCHF retrofitted a dozen Nike Air Max 97 shoes with holy water injected into the bubble soles to create its "Jesus Shoes". YouTube
    Brooklyn-based product design company MSCHF retrofitted a dozen Nike Air Max 97 shoes and injected holy water into the soles.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement