Advertisement
  1. News
  2. /
  3. Nation & World

Report: U.S. climber Brad Gobright died rappelling down rock face

The Outside magazine account described the fall as 600 feet.
In this Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019 handout photo released by Nuevo Leon State Civil Defense Agency, survivor Aidan Jacobson sits inside an ambulance  after he was rescued after falling from the El Potrero Chico peak in Hidalgo, Mexico. Jacobson was climbing with California free solo climber Brad Gobright who died in the fall, civil defense officials in northern Mexico reported Thursday. (Nuevo Leon State Civil Defense Agency via AP) [AP]
In this Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2019 handout photo released by Nuevo Leon State Civil Defense Agency, survivor Aidan Jacobson sits inside an ambulance after he was rescued after falling from the El Potrero Chico peak in Hidalgo, Mexico. Jacobson was climbing with California free solo climber Brad Gobright who died in the fall, civil defense officials in northern Mexico reported Thursday. (Nuevo Leon State Civil Defense Agency via AP) [AP]
Published Nov. 29, 2019

MEXICO CITY — California rock climber Brad Gobright reportedly reached the top of a highly challenging rock face route in northern Mexico, and was rappelling down with a companion when he fell to his death.

Climber Aidan Jacobson of Phoenix, Arizona told Outside magazine he was with Gobright, who reportedly performed a masterful ascent of the Sendero Luminoso route in the El Potrero Chico area near the northern city of Monterrey.

Civil defense officials in Nuevo Leon state said Gobright fell about 300 meters to his death on Wednesday. The Outside account described the fall as 600 feet.

His body was recovered Thursday. The publication Rock and Ice described Gobright, 31, as a native of Orange County, California, and "one of the most accomplished free solo climbers in the world."

Jacobson also fell, but a shorter distance, after something went wrong in the “simul-rappelling” descent. The technique involves two climbers balancing each other’s weight off an anchor point.

In online forums, many climbers described the technique as difficult and potentially dangerous.

According to Jacobson, the pair might not have evened out the length of the 80-meter rope between them, to ensure each had the same amount, because Gobright’s end was apparently tangled in some bushes near a ledge below them.

That might have caused Gobright to essentially run out of rope; without the balancing weight of the other climber, both would fall. Jacobson fell through some vegetation and onto the ledge they were aiming for, injuring his ankle. Gobright fell further.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

  1. In this photo made available by the Florida Highway patrol shows confiscated drugs following the arrest of two men Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2020, Santa Rosa County, Fla. Authorities confiscated methamphetamine, cocaine and fentanyl. (Florida Highway Patrol via AP) [AP]
  2. Trader Peter Mazza works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange Thursday, Feb. 27, 2020. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle) [CRAIG RUTTLE  |  AP]
  3. Brian Baumgartner, who played Kevin on "the Office," partnered with Bush's Beans to bring the chili his character was famous for spilling to life. [Bush's Beans]
  4. Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., speaks during a news conference about the "Emmett Till Antilynching Act" which would designate lynching as a hate crime under federal law, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday. Emmett Till, pictured at right, was a 14-year-old African-American who was lynched in Mississippi in 1955, after being accused of offending a white woman in her family's grocery store. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) [J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE  |  AP]
  5. Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, center, speaks during a meeting of a task force on the new coronavirus at his official residence in Tokyo Thursday. Abe was asking all elementary, middle and high schools to remain shut until spring holidays begin in late March. (Kyodo News via AP) [菅原善孝  |  AP]
  6. One or more people have been using fake cash to buy Girl Scout cookies, leaving troops in the Bradenton area out hundreds of dollars, according to news reports. [JUAN CARLOS CHAVEZ  |  CENTRO Tampa]
  7. Guests walk down Main Street with Cinderella's Castle in the background at Magic Kingdom in Orlando in this 2019 file photo. Walt Disney World told some cast members to stay home because of their recent trip to Italy and the possibility of coronavirus infection.
  8. President Donald Trump, with members of the president's coronavirus task force, speaks during a news conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House, Wednesday in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci) [EVAN VUCCI  |  AP]
  9. In this June 28, 2018, file photo, a police officer stands guard outside The New York Times building in New York. The campaign to reelect President Donald Trump sued The New York Times for defamation Wednesday, saying it was responsible for an essay by a former executive editor for the newspaper that claimed the campaign made a deal with Russian officials to defeat Hillary Clinton in 2016. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File) [MARY ALTAFFER  |  AP]
  10. Police respond to reports of an active shooting at the Molson Coors Brewing Co. campus in Milwaukee on Wednesday [MORRY GASH  |  Associated Press]
  11. This 2007 image released by G.P. Putnam's Sons shows author Clive Cussler riding in a classic car. Cussler died on Monday at his home in Scottsdale, AZ. He was 88. [UNKNOWN  |  Ronnie Bramhall/G.P. Putnam's Sons via AP]
  12. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar testifies before a House Appropriations subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) [SUSAN WALSH  |  AP]
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement