Advertisement
  1. News
  2. /
  3. Nation & World

Watch: ‘Joy ride’ driver arrested at gunpoint on Super Bowl parade route

Deputies threw out Stop Sticks and several patrol cars surrounded the car and stopped it as it approached the crowd near Union Station.
In this image take from video, law enforcement personnel surround a car after it was stopped as the driver approached the crowd near Union Station attending the Super Bowl parade and rally for the Kansas City Chief in Kansas City, Mo., Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (FOXKC via AP) [AP]
In this image take from video, law enforcement personnel surround a car after it was stopped as the driver approached the crowd near Union Station attending the Super Bowl parade and rally for the Kansas City Chief in Kansas City, Mo., Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (FOXKC via AP) [AP]
Published Feb. 5

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An impaired driver taking a “joy ride” Wednesday along the Kansas City Chiefs’ Super Bowl parade route was put into a forced spin by law enforcement officers who then arrested the driver and another person at gunpoint, according to officials and video footage of the incident.

Clay County Sheriff's deputies threw out Stop Sticks and several patrol cars surrounded the car and stopped it as it approached the crowd near Union Station, police said. Video posted by WDAF-TV showed officers approaching the car with weapons drawn before taking two people into custody. The arrest happened around three hours before the parade began, and no one was injured.

Mayor Quinton Lucas told the TV station that it was an impaired driver taking "a joy ride" and was not terrorism-related. He praised the quick response of the officers who responded, who were cheered by fans who witnessed the incident.

“We have even more heroes to cheer today,” Lucas said.

Fans streamed into downtown Kansas City by the thousands early Wednesday for the parade and rally to celebrate the Chiefs' first Super Bowl championship in 50 years. Some even camped out overnight to reserve choice spots along the route, which will take the team from the intersection of Sixth Street and Grand Boulevard to the rally outside Union Station.

“This is so awesome,” said Shauntel Lyons, 40, of Kansas City, who was a Chiefs cheerleader from 2003 to 2005. “I learned so many great lessons from my time with the team. To see them bring home that trophy after 50 years is so gratifying. I'm just glad to be part of it.”

Fans bundled up for chilly conditions and the forecast said 2 to 3 inches of snow were possible during the parade.

The Kansas Legislature took the day off to celebrate and their Missouri counterparts scheduled a light workday. Many area businesses also planned to close or open on a reduced schedule. At Children's Mercy Kansas City, the emergency room at the main downtown hospital will be open, but appointments and some surgeries were being rescheduled or moved.

When the Royals won the World Series in 2015, an estimated 800,000 people flocked to the victory parade, shattering expectations in a city with a population of about 470,000 and a metropolitan area of about 2 million. Cellphone towers were overwhelmed by the throngs, and motorists began parking along side of the interstate and walking as exits jammed.

The city has learned from that experience, adding a temporary cell tower and increasing the number of portable toilets to 700 from 200. Officials also are boosting the number of lost child stations, which was deemed crucial after about 100 youngsters became separated from their caretakers in 2015.

To ease parking congestion, the city provided more than 400 buses to run free shuttles, which were pulling out of the drop-off sites every 20 to 30 seconds full of fans. During the Royals parade, commuter buses essentially failed and many fans didn't get to the parade site because the buses got stuck in traffic.

Police Major Chip Huth said law enforcement from 19 surrounding agencies would help to provide security for the masses.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

  1. FILE - In this June 28, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump, right, shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, during a bilateral meeting on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan. Intelligence officials say Russia is interfering with the 2020 election to try to help Trump get reelected, The New York Times reported Thursday, Feb. 20, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
  2. FILE - This Jan. 9, 2020 file photo released by the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation shows Jonathan Watson. Watson has confessed that he beat two child molesters to death with a cane while behind bars and says his urgent warning to a counselor that he might become violent was ignored. (California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation via AP,File)
  3. Roger Stone accompanied by his wife Nydia Stone, left, arrives for his sentencing at U.S. District Court in Washington, Thursday. Stone, a staunch ally of President Donald Trump, faces sentencing Thursday on his convictions for witness tampering and lying to Congress. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
  4. Police stand guard near the scene of a shooting in central Hanau, Germany Thursday. German police say several people were shot to death in the city of Hanau on Wednesday evening. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)
  5. Korri Loader, a friend of the victims of a car fire, sits at a makeshift memorial, Thursday, near the scene of a car fire which claimed the lives of a mother and her three young children in Brisbane, Australia. Hannah Baxter, 31, and her children Aaliyah, 6, Lainah, 4, and Trey, 3, died after their car was set alight on a street in suburban Brisbane on Wednesday morning. (Dan Peled/AAP Image via AP)
  6. Democratic presidential candidate, former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg talks with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., during a break at a Democratic presidential primary debate Wednesday, in Las Vegas, hosted by NBC News and MSNBC. (AP Photo/John Locher)
  7. In this Jan. 22, 2020, file photo, Attorney General William Barr arrives for an ceremony at the Department of Justice in Washington, to announce the establishment of the Presidential Commission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, and its commissioners. Barr has told people close to him he’s considering quitting his post after President Donald Trump wouldn’t heed his warning to stop tweeting about Justice Department cases. (AP Photo/Michael A. McCoy, File)
  8. In this March 14, 2012, file photo, former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich speaks to the media outside his home in Chicago as his wife, Patti, wipes away tears a day before reporting to prison after his conviction on corruption charges. President Donald Trump is expected to commute the 14-year prison sentence of Blagojevich. The 63-year-old Democrat is expected to walk out of prison later Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2020. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)
  9. In this Aug. 8, 2015, file photo former owner of the San Francisco 49ers Edward DeBartolo, Jr., is interviewed before the Pro Football Hall of Fame ceremony at Tom Benson Hall of Fame Stadium in Canton, Ohio. President Donald Trump pardoned DeBartolo, who was convicted in gambling fraud scandal. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
  10. In this Nov. 7, 2019 file photo, the first panels of levee border wall are seen at a construction site along the U.S.-Mexico border, in Donna, Texas. The Trump administration said Tuesday that it will waive federal contracting laws to speed construction of the border wall with Mexico. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)
  11. Democratic presidential candidate Mike Bloomberg gives his thumbs-up after speaking during a campaign event at Hardywood Park Craft Brewery in Richmond, Va., Feb. 15, 2020. (James H. Wallace/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)
  12. In this Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020, photo, a statue stands outside the Boys Scouts of America headquarters in Irving, Texas. The Boy Scouts of America has filed for bankruptcy protection as it faces a barrage of new sex-abuse lawsuits. The filing Tuesday, in Wilmington, Delaware, is an attempt to work out a potentially mammoth compensation plan for abuse victims that will allow the 110-year-old organization to carry on. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement