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New Orleans left powerless as Hurricane Ida lashes Louisiana

Thousands were left without power as Ida becomes the fifth-strongest hurricane to hit the U.S. One was reported dead in Baton Rouge.
This satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and captured by NOAA's GOES-16 shows lightning swirling around the eye of Hurricane Ida as the storm approaches the Louisiana coast on Sunday morning.
This satellite image provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and captured by NOAA's GOES-16 shows lightning swirling around the eye of Hurricane Ida as the storm approaches the Louisiana coast on Sunday morning. [ AP ]
Published Aug. 29
Updated Aug. 30

NEW ORLEANS — Hurricane Ida blasted ashore Sunday as one of the most powerful storms ever to hit the U.S., knocking out power to all of New Orleans, blowing roofs off buildings and reversing the flow of the Mississippi River as it rushed from the Louisiana coast into one of the nation’s most important industrial corridors.

The hurricane was blamed for at least one death. The Ascension Parish Sheriff’s Office said on Facebook that deputies responded to a home in Prairieville on a report of someone injured by a fallen tree. The person, who was not identified, was pronounced dead. Prairieville is a suburb of Baton Rouge, Louisiana’s capital city.

The power outage in New Orleans heightened the city’s vulnerability to flooding and left hundreds of thousands of people without air conditioning and refrigeration in sweltering summer heat.

The forecasted path of Hurricane Ida, according to the National Hurricane Center's 4 p.m. Sunday advisory.
The forecasted path of Hurricane Ida, according to the National Hurricane Center's 4 p.m. Sunday advisory. [ National Hurricane Center ]

Ida — a Category 4 storm — hit on the same date Hurricane Katrina ravaged Louisiana and Mississippi 16 years earlier, coming ashore about 45 miles (72 kilometers) west of where Category 3 Katrina first struck land. Ida’s 150-mph (230 kph) winds tied it for the fifth-strongest hurricane to ever hit the mainland U.S. It dropped hours later to a Category 2 storm with maximum winds of 105 mph (165 kph) as it crawled inland, its eye about 40 miles (65 kilometers) west-northwest of New Orleans.

The rising ocean swamped the barrier island of Grand Isle as landfall came just to the west at Port Fourchon. Ida made a second landfall about two hours later near Galliano. The hurricane was churning through the far southern Louisiana wetlands, with the more than 2 million people living in and around New Orleans and Baton Rouge under threat.

“This is going to be much stronger than we usually see and, quite frankly, if you had to draw up the worst possible path for a hurricane in Louisiana, it would be something very, very close to what we’re seeing,” Gov. John Bel Edwards told The Associated Press.

A section of roof that was blown off of a building in New Orleans' French Quarter by Hurricane Ida on Sunday blocks an intersection.
A section of roof that was blown off of a building in New Orleans' French Quarter by Hurricane Ida on Sunday blocks an intersection. [ ERIC GAY | AP ]

People in Louisiana woke up to a monster storm after Ida’s top winds grew by 45 mph (72 kph) in five hours as the hurricane moved through some of the warmest ocean water in the world in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

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The entire city of New Orleans late Sunday was without power, according to city officials. The city’s power supplier — Entergy — confirmed that the only power in the city was coming from generators, the city’s Office of Homeland Security & Emergency Preparedness said on Twitter. The message included a screen shot that cited “catastrophic transmission damage” for the power failure.

The city relies on Entergy for backup power for the pumps that remove storm water from city streets. Rain from Ida is expected to test that pump system.

More than 1 million customers were without power in two Southern states impacted by Ida — more than 930,000 in Louisiana and 28,000 in Mississippi, according to PowerOutage.US, which tracks outages nationwide.

A satellite image of Hurricane Ida, one of the most powerful storms to make land fall in the U.S. The Category 4 storm made landfall Sunday in Louisiana on the same date Hurricane Katrina ravaged Louisiana and Mississippi 16 years earlier.
A satellite image of Hurricane Ida, one of the most powerful storms to make land fall in the U.S. The Category 4 storm made landfall Sunday in Louisiana on the same date Hurricane Katrina ravaged Louisiana and Mississippi 16 years earlier. [ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ]

In New Orleans, wind tore at awnings and caused buildings to sway and water to spill out of Lake Ponchartrain. The Coast Guard office in New Orleans received more than a dozen reports of breakaway barges, said Petty Officer Gabriel Wisdom. In Lafitte about 35 miles (55 km) south of New Orleans, a loose barge struck a bridge, according to Jefferson Parish officials.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers spokesman Ricky Boyette said engineers detected a “negative flow” on the Mississippi River as a result of storm surge. And Edwards said he watched a live video feed from around Port Fourchon as Ida came ashore that showed that roofs had been blown off buildings in “many places.”

“The storm surge is just tremendous,” Edwards told the AP.

A young girl blocks her face from the wind and rain produced by Hurricane Ida in New Orleans on Sunday.
A young girl blocks her face from the wind and rain produced by Hurricane Ida in New Orleans on Sunday. [ ERIC GAY | AP ]

Officials said Ida’s swift intensification from a few thunderstorms to a massive hurricane in just three days left no time to organize a mandatory evacuation of New Orleans’ 390,000 residents. Mayor LaToya Cantrell urged residents remaining in the city on Sunday to “hunker down.”

Marco Apostolico said he felt confident riding out the storm at his home in New Orleans’ Lower 9th Ward, one of the city’s hardest-hit neighborhoods when levees failed and released a torrent of floodwater during Katrina.

His home was among those rebuilt with the help of actor Brad Pitt to withstand hurricane-force winds. But the memory of Katrina still hung over the latest storm.

“It’s obviously a lot of heavy feelings,” he said. “And yeah, potentially scary and dangerous.”

Floodwaters inundated the parking lot at Flexi's Fish Camp along the Spanish Fort Causeway on Sunday as the outer bands of Hurricane Ida arrive into coastal Alabama.
Floodwaters inundated the parking lot at Flexi's Fish Camp along the Spanish Fort Causeway on Sunday as the outer bands of Hurricane Ida arrive into coastal Alabama.

The region getting Ida’s worst includes petrochemical sites and major ports, which could sustain significant damage. It is also an area that is already reeling from a resurgence of COVID-19 infections due to low vaccination rates and the highly contagious delta variant.

New Orleans hospitals planned to ride out the storm with their beds nearly full, as similarly stressed hospitals elsewhere had little room for evacuated patients. And shelters for those fleeing their homes carried an added risk of becoming flashpoints for new infections.

Forecasters warned winds stronger than 115 mph (185 kph) threatened Houma, a city of 33,000 that supports oil platforms in the Gulf.

The hurricane was also threatening neighboring Mississippi, where Katrina demolished oceanfront homes. With Ida approaching, Claudette Jones evacuated her home east of Gulfport, Mississippi, as waves started pounding the shore.

“I’m praying I can go back to a normal home like I left,” she said. “That’s what I’m praying for. But I’m not sure at this point.”

A person walks through New Orleans' French Quarter ahead of Hurricane Ida on Sunday.
A person walks through New Orleans' French Quarter ahead of Hurricane Ida on Sunday. [ BRANDON BELL | Getty Images North America ]

Comparisons to the Aug. 29, 2005, landfall of Katrina weighed heavily on residents bracing for Ida. Katrina was blamed for 1,800 deaths as it caused levee breaches and catastrophic flooding in New Orleans. Ida’s hurricane-force winds stretched 50 miles (80 kilometers) from the storm’s eye, or about half the size of Katrina, and a New Orleans’ infrastructure official emphasized that the city is in a “very different place than it was 16 years ago.”

The levee system has been massively overhauled since Katrina, Ramsey Green, deputy chief administrative officer for infrastructure, said before the worst of the storm hit. While water may not penetrate levees, Green said if forecasts of up to 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain prove true, the city’s underfunded and neglected network of pumps, underground pipes and surface canals likely won’t be able to keep up.

An abandoned vehicle is half submerged in a ditch next to a near flooded highway as the outer bands of Hurricane Ida arrive Sunday in  Bay Saint Louis, Miss.
An abandoned vehicle is half submerged in a ditch next to a near flooded highway as the outer bands of Hurricane Ida arrive Sunday in Bay Saint Louis, Miss. [ STEVE HELBER | AP ]

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality was in contact with more than 1,500 oil refineries, chemical plants and other sensitive facilities and will respond to any reported pollution leaks or petroleum spills, agency spokesman Greg Langley said. He said the agency would deploy three mobile air-monitoring laboratories after the storm passes to sample, analyze and report any threats to public health.

Louisiana’s 17 oil refineries account for nearly one-fifth of the U.S. refining capacity and its two liquefied natural gas export terminals ship about 55% of the nation’s total exports, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Government statistics show that 95% of oil and gas production in the Gulf Coast region was shut down as Ida made landfall on Sunday, according to energy company S&P Global Platts.

A utility worker photographs waves as they slam against a sea wall at the city marina as outer bands of Hurricane Ida arrive Sunday in Bay Saint Louis, Miss.
A utility worker photographs waves as they slam against a sea wall at the city marina as outer bands of Hurricane Ida arrive Sunday in Bay Saint Louis, Miss. [ STEVE HELBER | AP ]

Louisiana is also home to two nuclear power plants, one near New Orleans and another about 27 miles (about 43 kilometers) northwest of Baton Rouge.

President Joe Biden approved emergency declarations for Louisiana and Mississippi ahead of Ida’s arrival. He said Sunday the country was praying for the best for Louisiana and would put its “full might behind the rescue and recovery” effort once the storm passes.

Edwards warned his state to brace for potentially weeks of recovery.

“Many, many people are going to be tested in ways that we can only imagine today,” the governor told a news conference.

By Associated Press Writers Rebecca Santana, Kevin McGill and Jay Reeves, who reported from Gulfport, Mississippi. Associated Press writers Rebecca Santana, Stacey Plaisance and Janet McConnaughey in New Orleans; Emily Wagster Pettus in Jackson, Mississippi; Jeff Martin in Marietta, Georgia; Seth Borenstein in Kensington, Maryland; Frank Bajak in Boston; Michael Biesecker in Washington; Pamela Sampson in Atlanta; and Jeffrey Collins in Columbia, South Carolina, contributed to this report.

A man in a wheelchair takes cover in a bus stop shelter as Hurricane Ida begins to make landfall on Sunday in New Orleans, La.
A man in a wheelchair takes cover in a bus stop shelter as Hurricane Ida begins to make landfall on Sunday in New Orleans, La. [ ERIC GAY | AP ]
Victor Lopez, right, and Christian Zamora work to board the windows of a business in in Lafayette as Hurricane Ida approached Louisiana on Sunday.
Victor Lopez, right, and Christian Zamora work to board the windows of a business in in Lafayette as Hurricane Ida approached Louisiana on Sunday. [ DAVID J. PHILLIP | AP ]

• • •

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NEED TO KNOW: Click here to find your evacuation zone and shelter