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Family recalls boy killed by alligator in Fla.

Omaha, Neb.

Family recalls boy killed by alligator in Fla.

The parents of the toddler who was killed by an alligator at Walt Disney World in Orlando say they will always remember their sweet little boy. Melissa and Matt Graves spoke to a group of several hundred people gathered at a high school football stadium Saturday to remember Lane Graves on what would have been his third birthday, the Omaha World-Herald reported. Lane died June 14 after an alligator pulled him into a lagoon at Disney's upscale Grand Floridian Resort. He was gathering sand for a sand castle when the alligator bit his head. The final report on his death said the boy died from a crushing bite and drowning and that his dad reached into the alligator's mouth to try to save the boy. After Lane's death, Disney made changes to restrict visitor contact with alligators on the property. Melissa Graves said the family wanted to celebrate Lane's "first birthday in heaven."

Stinson BEACH, Calif.

California native salmon struggling

California's iconic native salmon are struggling amid five years of drought. On a recent fishing trip by the Salty Lady charter boat just north of the Golden Gate Bridge, fishermen were hooking native Chinook salmon that had been born at state and federal hatcheries and then carried in trucks for release downstream. Golden Gate Salmon Association president Victor Gonella says trucking is the only reason the state's vital fall-run salmon survived the previous two years of drought. Federal authorities have named another native California salmon, the winter-run Chinook, as one of the nation's eight most endangered species. Native salmon support a $1.4 billion commercial and sport fishing industry for salmon in the state. They are also critical food sources for West Coast animals ranging from orcas to bears and eagles.

Nigeria

Military says officers sell guns to militants

Nigeria's military says some officers are selling arms and ammunition to Boko Haram, indicating the corruption bedeviling the country's fight against the Islamic extremists continues despite government efforts to halt graft. The admission comes three weeks after the army said a military tribunal is trying 16 officers and troops accused of offenses related to the fight against Boko Haram, including the theft and sale of ammunition.

Associated Press

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