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  1. Florida Politics

No religion specifically exempt from health care law

Published Jun. 4, 2013

The statement

Says the word "Dhimmitude" is on Page 107 of the health care law and means "Muslims are specifically exempted from the government mandate to purchase insurance."

Chain email

The ruling

The word "dhimmitude" is not in the health care law.

We know this because we did a full-text search on both the main law (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) and a companion law (the Health Care and Reconciliation Act). It's not in either one.

What is "Dhimmitude"? Well, here's what the email claims:

Dhimmitude ... It's on page 107 of the health care bill. I looked this up on Google and yep, it exists. It is a REAL word.

Dhimmitude is the Muslim system of controlling non-Muslim populations conquered through jihad (Holy War). Specifically, it is the TAXING of non-Muslims in exchange for tolerating their presence AND as a coercive means of converting conquered remnants to Islam.

ObamaCare allows the establishment of Dhimmitude and Sharia Muslim diktat in the United States. Muslims are specifically exempted from the government mandate to purchase insurance, and also from the penalty tax for being uninsured. Islam considers insurance to be 'gambling,' 'risk-taking,' and 'usury' and is thus banned. Muslims are specifically granted exemption based on this. ...

We turned to The Oxford Dictionary of Islam. It does not contain the word "Dhimmitude," but it does include "dhimmi."

The dictionary says that dhimmi is a historical term used to describe a "non-Muslim under protection of Muslim law," which could include Jews, Christians or Hindus. Adult male dhimmis were required to pay taxes and follow regulations on dress, occupation and residence. In return, dhimmis received "security of life and property, defense against enemies, communal self-government, and freedom of religion practice." The dictionary notes that dhimmi status has lost relevance in the present day because of the rise of nation-states and modern legal codes.

We won't dwell on this since neither word is in the health law.

The email goes on to claim that the law specifically exempts Muslims. That's not the case either.

The health care law has a general exception for religious conscience (page 128). But it does not mention any particular religion, denomination or sect. During debate over the legislation, the people most often mentioned as wanting an exemption were adherents of Christian Science, a faith that prefers prayer to conventional medical treatment.

For promoting absurd notions and wild fabrication, we have three words: Pants on Fire!

Edited for print. Read the full version at PolitiFact.com.

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