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Thousands rally, march in nationwide anti-Trump protests (w/video)

In Los Angeles, thousands march through downtown Saturday to show their displeasure with stances taken by President-elect Donald Trump along the campaign trail.
In Los Angeles, thousands march through downtown Saturday to show their displeasure with stances taken by President-elect Donald Trump along the campaign trail.
Published Nov. 13, 2016

NEW YORK — Thousands of demonstrators in cities across the country filled public squares, parks and streets Saturday to protest President-elect Donald Trump, part of a wave of national resistance not seen in recent election cycles.

They were transgender individuals, the children of immigrants and parents toting infants on their backs. They were families, students, and men and women of all ages and races. Many carried cardboard signs — "Show the world what the popular vote looks like," read one, "Putin Won," said another. As throngs marched through city streets, the participants joined in a cry of "Not my president!"

In one of the largest anti-Trump demonstrations since his election Tuesday, a mass of people marched from Union Square in Manhattan to Trump Tower, the headquarters and home of Trump. Protesters marched around one of Trump's buildings in Chicago. In Los Angeles, thousands of people marched up Wilshire Boulevard, forming a crowd that stretched for nearly a dozen blocks.

"I'm just doing my part in democracy," said Alfred Diaz, 25, who joined the protest in Los Angeles. "I feel that this is a way for me to voice my opinion."

"I disagree with a lot of Trump's stances, so I'm just out here practicing my rights," said Diaz, who was born in Los Angeles but whose family is from Mexico. "I'm unsure and I'm unsatisfied."

The demonstrations followed nearly a week of protests, as thousands of people have taken to the streets. Demonstrations have taken place in Oakland, Calif.; Baltimore; Kansas City, Mo.; Milwaukee; Miami; and Portland, Ore.

Students have walked out of classes, protesters have blocked highways, and demonstrators have clashed with the police. Speakers and protesters have talked about their fears of deportation, reduced access to birth control, a rollback of same-sex marriage and the potential for racially motivated violence.

Many protest leaders had supported Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., in the Democratic primary race and either did not vote or chose a third-party candidate in the general election, said Ben Becker, an organizer with the Answer Coalition, an anti-war and anti-racism activist group based in New York. Their anger, he said, had been exacerbated by the conciliatory tone shown to Trump by President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton after Clinton's defeat.

More protests are planned for the coming days.

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