Advertisement
  1. Florida Politics

Secret Service visit, GOP push don't deter Black

Joshua Black, shown on his Facebook page, is still running for the House after calling for the president to be hanged.
Published Jan. 22, 2014

Say you're a rookie political candidate eager to raise your profile. Here's one sure way to do that you DO NOT want to try: publicly call for the president of the United States to be hanged.

That's what Republican state House candidate Joshua Black did on Twitter Monday. It generated a widely read article in the Tampa Bay Times, a call from Anderson Cooper's guest booker, an interview for Political Connections on Bay News 9 and, naturally, a visit from the Secret Service.

Black, a taxi driver, said that Secret Service representatives were waiting for him at his house while he taped the Political Connections interview.

"It was not a threat," said Black, insisting that his tweet — "I'm past impeachment. It's time to arrest and hang him high" — was merely expressing outrage over the president killing U.S. citizens with drone attacks and without due process.

Black said he resigned from the Pinellas County Republican Executive Committee at the request of county chairman Michael Guju. But he dismissed a tweet from Gov. Rick Scott Tuesday that Black "immediately withdraw his candidacy to represent families of Pinellas County."

"I do not take orders from the governor, I'm staying in the race," said Black, a candidate for Florida House District 68.

Jolly's poll says he's ahead

An internal poll from Republican David Jolly's campaign shows Jolly leading Democrat Alex Sink by 5 percentage points, 43 percent to 38 percent.

The Jolly campaign released the memo to supporters in an attempt to raise money, warning that Sink and Democrats would pour "millions upon millions" into the contest for Florida's 13th Congressional District.

Hoyer to raise funds for Sink

U.S. House Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer is scheduled to headline a fundraiser for Alex Sink Jan. 29 at the St. Petersburg home of Bloomin' Brands CEO Liz Smith and her husband, Chip Newton. Others on the host committee include Home Shopping Network CEO Mindy Grossman, Bill and Jeanne Heller, Lindsey Jarrell, Craig Sher, Lorna Taylor, Scott Wagman and Beth Houghton.

Scott lines up press team

Changes are under way in Gov. Rick Scott's communications shop.

With communications director Melissa Sellers leaving to manage Scott's re-election campaign, Frank Collins III has been named Scott's official spokesman.

Collins, like Sellers, was part of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal's press operation before coming to Florida.

Also joining Scott's revamped election-year press shop as deputy communications director is Monica Russell. Russell, a University of Florida graduate, had been director of communications at the Department of Economic Opportunity.

Springs protection bubbling up

Gov. Rick Scott called on the Legislature Tuesday to spend $55 million in next year's budget for the restoration and protection of springs in Florida. He made the announcement in Tallahassee at an event honoring the work of 125 employees in the Department of Environmental Protection.

"We need to continue to protect our springs. They're part of our state parks. They're part of our heritage," Scott told reporters afterward.

That $55 million may sound like a lot of money, but the Senate is talking about appropriating nearly $380 for springs protection — seven times as much as Scott's proposal.

Times staff writers Alex Leary and Steve Bousquet contributed to this week's Buzz.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Florida Governor elect Ron DeSantis, right, thanks Lev Parnas on Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018 in Orlando at the watch party for DeSantis. DeSantis defeated Democratic candidate Andrew Gillum. CHRIS URSO | TIMES CHRIS URSO  |  Times
    A Tampa Bay Times photograph and a video posted by a Reuters reporter shows Parnas smiling with DeSantis amid the chaos of the watch party.
  2. Andrew Gillum.
    Sharon Lettman-Hicks, one of Andrew Gillum’s closest advisers, helped the Florida Democratic Party register new voters.
  3. Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla. [DAVID SANTIAGO | Miami Herald]
    Scott’s received contributions from the two associates of Rudy Giuliani who were arrested last week.
  4. Emissions from cars and trucks are a major source of the greenhouse gases fueling climate change. An analysis by the New York Times found that air pollution from those sources has increased in the Tampa Bay area by 55 percent since 1990. [Times (2008)]
    Florida once had emissions inspections, but Jeb Bush ended them in 2000
  5. Trump National Doral resort in Doral. EMILY MICHOT  |  TNS
    Gov. Ron DeSantis, who was listed as a speaker Friday evening, appeared that night at the Republican Party of Miami-Dade County’s Lincoln Day Dinner, a well-attended gala also held at Trump National...
  6. Miami-Dade School Superintendent Alberto Carvalho, 55, is now in his 11th year leading the fourth largest school district in the nation. Miami Herald
    The charismatic leader of the nation’s fourth-largest school district has a complicated legacy. He almost took over the Pinellas County School District in 2008.
  7. Senator Wilton Simpson, R- Trilby, examines papers as he enter the Florida Capitol, Wednesday, May 1, 2019 during the last week of the sixty day legislative session. SCOTT KEELER  |  Tampa Bay Times
    The man once called “the Donald Trump of regional egg farmers" is in line to become leader of Florida’s Senate in 2020
  8. Tampa firefighter Tanja Vidovic steps out of the federal courthouse in Tampa in during the 2017 federal trial of her sexual discrimination case against the city of Tampa. [CAITLIN JOHNSTON   |   Times]
    Tanja Vidovic will run against incumbent Joe Ayoub in the city’s March 2020 elections.
  9. In this image from a telecast by The Florida Channel, Florida education commissioner Richard Corcoran speaks to a Gainesville crowd that came to discuss revisions to the state's education standards this past week. “We’re going to end up with the world’s best standards,” Corcoran said. The Florida Channel
    The effort, ordered by Gov. Ron DeSantis, aims to transform the way students learn in public schools. A “listening session” is set for Tampa’s Jefferson High.
  10. The annual assault on Florida’s public records law begins anew today in the Legislature.
    “It’s pretty alarming what they’re doing here,” said a former Florida long-term care ombudsman who now runs an advocacy group for residents.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement