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A 95-year-old grandmother hit her granddaughter with a slipper. She was arrested

Hattie Reynolds, 95, was arrested after she allegedly hit her 46-year-old granddaughter in the face with a slipper.[Volusia County Corrections]
Hattie Reynolds, 95, was arrested after she allegedly hit her 46-year-old granddaughter in the face with a slipper.[Volusia County Corrections]
Published May 10, 2018

Daytona Beach police officers arrested a 95-year-old woman after she got in an argument with her granddaughter and slapped her in the face with a slipper.

Hattie Reynolds called law enforcement through a non-emergency number to say that she was sick of her granddaughter, 46-year-old Janeen Williams, sitting in her room and enjoying the air conditioning, according to the Daytona Beach News-Journal.

"I got a gran in my bed and I can't ... get her out from my bed," Reynolds told officers, according to the News-Journal. "I ain't got nothing to pay bill on air condition all the time for her to go into the room."

She went on to say that Williams refused to listen to her and that she didn't want to get in trouble. At one point, Williams "was screaming and swearing" at Reynolds, according to a police report obtained by the News-Journal.

"(Hattie Reynolds) then began to start yelling and smacked (Janeen Williams) in the face with the shoes she had on," the report read, according to the News-Journal.

However, Williams didn't want to press charges and didn't give a statement. When police showed up at the home, the granddaughter told them she wasn't injured, didn't want to press charges and refused to give a statement.

The officers then reluctantly arrested Reynolds at her home and kept her overnight. She was released May 5 on her own recognizance, the News-Journal reported.

Daytona Beach Police Chief Craig Capri told the News-Journal that officer's had to make the arrest, even if victims don't press charges. That doesn't mean he was happy about it.

"Under the law domestic violence is a very serious offense and officers' hands are tied," Capri said. "Discretion is taken away from them by the law."

Capri said his officers made sure they didn't harm Reynolds when brought her in.

"They were very polite and made sure she was as comfortable as possible," Capri said. "She was given time to change clothes and her hands were handcuffed in front of her instead of on her back."

After the brief stint behind bars, Reynolds told the News-Journal that "only my feet hurt and I need to sit."

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