St. Petersburg woman fires at car full of kids, wounds 5-year-old, police say

The child was wounded in the leg and the injury is not considered life-threatening. Police said a domestic dispute led to the gunfire.
Jamesha Flanning, 27, was arrested on six counts of attempted murder and is accused of wounding a 5-year-old boy in the leg, according to St. Petersburg police. [Pinellas County Sheriff's Office]
Jamesha Flanning, 27, was arrested on six counts of attempted murder and is accused of wounding a 5-year-old boy in the leg, according to St. Petersburg police. [Pinellas County Sheriff's Office]
Published February 12

ST. PETERSBURG — A domestic dispute led to gunshots being fired at a car full of young children Monday night, police said, leaving a 5-year-old boy with a gunshot wound to the leg.

Now the woman accused of firing at them faces six counts of attempted murder.

Jamesha Flanning, 27, was arrested on those six charges on Monday and one count of throwing a deadly missile into an occupied vehicle. She is being held in the Pinellas County jail in lieu of $910,000 bail.

The 5-year-old who was wounded was struck in the left thigh. Police said his injuries were not considered life-threatening. The other children, who ranged in ages from 4 to 7, escaped injury.

The incident took place at about 5:45 p.m. outside 1131 32nd St. S. Two women were retrieving personal belongings from Flanning’s home, police said. The four children were in their car.

Then Flanning walked outside armed with a Taurus 9mm semi-automatic pistol and started shooting, police said.

The two women got back into the car and drove off.

The car was struck four times, St. Petersburg police said, and one bullet wounded the 5-year-old.

The victims in this case asked that their names not be made public by police under Marsy’s law, an amendment to the Florida Constitution approved by voters in November. The amendment is a victim’s bill of rights that many law enforcement agencies have interpreted as requiring them to withhold basic identifying information about crime victims. Open government advocates say that interpretation is wrong and violates Florida’s public records law.

Contact McKenna Oxenden at moxenden@tampabay.com. Follow @mack_oxenden.

Advertisement
Also In This Section
Advertisement
Advertisement