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Tampa startup brings first 3D-printed home to the region

The home will be built faster and stronger than a traditional house, the developer said.
A rendering of the 3D-printed home planned for 7509 S Shamrock Road in Tampa. The home is listed for $599,300.
A rendering of the 3D-printed home planned for 7509 S Shamrock Road in Tampa. The home is listed for $599,300. [ Click, Point, Home ]
Published Nov. 18|Updated Nov. 18

The first 3D-printed home in the Tampa Bay area is now up for sale, with an asking price of $599,300.

On Friday, Tampa startup Click, Print, Home partnered with real estate brokerage Compass Florida to list the three-bedroom, two-bathroom home at 7509 S Shamrock Road in Tampa.

The founder and president of Tampa startup Click, Print, Home, Matt Gibson, said he believes 3D printing technology will transform the construction industry in Florida.
The founder and president of Tampa startup Click, Print, Home, Matt Gibson, said he believes 3D printing technology will transform the construction industry in Florida. [ Click, Print, Home ]

Once a buyer signs on, construction will take about six months from start to finish, said Click, Print, Home’s founder and president, Matt Gibson. That’s roughly half the time it takes to build a traditional home.

Gibson said he believes this technology has the potential to transform the construction industry in Florida and expand the supply of available homes.

An Iowa-based company called Alquist 3D will provide the 3D printer. Robotic arms from the 3D printer will layer concrete to create the home’s structure. This process is more precise than using human labor and will cut down on the amount of material waste by about 95%.

Construction of the home will take about six months to complete. That's roughly half the time it would take to build a traditional home.
Construction of the home will take about six months to complete. That's roughly half the time it would take to build a traditional home. [ Click, Print, Home ]

The finished product will also be about four times stronger than a typical concrete home. “This is going to be so much more resistant to wind, water and termites, which is huge for Florida,” Gibson said.

If this project is successful, Gibson said he would like to build an entire community of 3D-printed homes. He pointed to a similar project that is already underway in Texas.

“This is the most efficient way to build a home,” he said. “It’s just a matter of time until this is the only way.”

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