Advertisement
  1. News
  2. /
  3. Tampa

Young racers face sentencing in Bayshore deaths

John Barrineau, 20, agreed to a six-year sentence. Cameron Herrin will ask a judge’s mercy in a future court hearing.
Tampa police investigate the scene of a fatal 2018 collision on Bayshore Boulevard. The driver of a black 2018 Mustang GT is accused of fatally running down a mother and her 21-month-old daughter while they legally crossed the road. [JAMES BORCHUCK | Times]
Tampa police investigate the scene of a fatal 2018 collision on Bayshore Boulevard. The driver of a black 2018 Mustang GT is accused of fatally running down a mother and her 21-month-old daughter while they legally crossed the road. [JAMES BORCHUCK | Times]
Published Dec. 31, 2020
Updated Dec. 31, 2020

TAMPA — One of two young drivers who caused a collision that killed a mother and daughter on Bayshore Boulevard has agreed to go to prison, while the other will seek a judge’s mercy.

John Alexander Barrineau, who had yet to turn 18 when the 2018 crash occurred, pleaded guilty Thursday for his role in causing it. Now 20, he will serve six years in prison as part of an agreement with prosecutors.

Barrineau wasn’t the driver who struck the pair. But police and prosecutors accused him of racing a Nissan Altima against the driver who did.

Cameron Coyle Herrin, then 18, was driving a new Ford Mustang GT, a graduation present, the morning of May 23, 2018, when he plowed into Jessica Reisinger-Raubenolt, who was pushing her 21-month-old daughter, Lillia, in a stroller across the iconic Tampa roadway. Data that investigators obtained from the Mustang’s on-board navigation system indicated it was moving at 102 mph moments before the collision, according to prosecutors.

Related: Men accused in Bayshore crash to change pleas

Herrin, now 21, also pleaded guilty Thursday, but left it up to a judge to decide his sentence. A sentencing hearing is set for Feb. 18. He will remain free on bail until then.

John Barrineau, right, sits beside his attorney, Anthony Rickman, during a virtual court hearing Tuesday in Tampa. Barrineau pleaded guilty racing and vehicular homicide for his role in a 2018 traffic crash that killed a mother and daughter on Bayshore Boulevard.
John Barrineau, right, sits beside his attorney, Anthony Rickman, during a virtual court hearing Tuesday in Tampa. Barrineau pleaded guilty racing and vehicular homicide for his role in a 2018 traffic crash that killed a mother and daughter on Bayshore Boulevard. [ 13th Judicial Circuit Court ]
Cameron Herrin, left, sits with his attorney, John Fitzgibbons, during a virtual court hearing Thursday in Tampa. Herrin pleaded guilty to vehicular homicide and racing for his role in a 2018 traffic crash on Bayshore Boulevard that killed a mother and daughter.
Cameron Herrin, left, sits with his attorney, John Fitzgibbons, during a virtual court hearing Thursday in Tampa. Herrin pleaded guilty to vehicular homicide and racing for his role in a 2018 traffic crash on Bayshore Boulevard that killed a mother and daughter. [ 13th Judicial Circuit Court ]

Herrin will be able to present testimony from family members, friends and others who can speak about his character as he seeks mercy.

A judge will also likely hear from the Reisinger and Raubenolt families about how the crime impacted their lives.

Bob Reisinger, Jessica’s father and Lillia’s grandfather, watched Thursday’s hearing. When asked if he wanted to speak, he said only that he believed the plea arrangement was appropriate and that there would be more to say at Herrin’s sentencing.

“We plan to be there,” he said.

Herrin, appearing in court for the first time since his arrest, sat a few feet away from his attorney, John Fitzgibbons. A wall of law books provided their backdrop for the hour-long hearing, which was conducted via Zoom video conference.

Hillsborough Circuit Judge Christopher Nash asked a long series of questions of both defendants to ensure that they understood the consequences of their guilty pleas.

Herrin, seated straight-backed in a dark suit and tie, hands resting in his lap, gave the same calm reply to each: “yes, your honor.”

Asked a standard question about whether he was under the influence of medication, his attorney told the judge Herrin had taken medication for anxiety and to help with sleep. Asked about his educational background, Herrin said he has completed two years of college.

State sentencing guidelines for each young man suggested 18 years in prison. Herrin faces a maximum of 30 years.

Part of Barrineau’s plea agreement included a 15-year probation term to follow his release from prison. He also will have to complete 200 hours of community service, with 100 hours to include speaking to youth about the dangers of reckless driving.

Barrineau is required to turn himself in to the Hillsborough County jail by 5 p.m. Monday.