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Florida shocked by wave of snow flurries

Published Jan. 23, 2016

In case this winter hasn't been weird enough, the universe threw snow into the mix ... in Florida.

According to the University of Florida Weather Center website (and many bewildered social media posts), flurries hit Gainesville and other parts of North Florida on Saturday morning after a cold front moved through the state Friday.

The flakes coincide with a blizzard chugging through the Northeast, expected to drop two feet of snow in Washington, D.C., according to The New York Times.

While the Floridian flurries came and went quickly, several shocked residents took to social media to share photos and videos.

Keep the videos coming of the snow in #NFla! Use #WeatherTogether & we'll share them here >> https://t.co/2cz8TSvNHp pic.twitter.com/yNZiSpsr43

Florida snow https://t.co/IuPdH3AUlR via @youtube

Hard to see, but those are snowflakes in Snugglenugget's hair. Check it out @ufweather! #Gainesville pic.twitter.com/RmMiyoRQ8h

Some frozen precip this morning in GNV #weathertogether #snowzilla_inthe352 pic.twitter.com/EgTVZSwpmh

It's snowing in Gainesville. Never thought I'd see that

Send your snowy Florida photos to kvarn@tampabay.com.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Hurricane Jerry is expected to begin moving to the north on Saturday. A tropical wave is expected to develop off the coast of Africa over the weekend. National Hurricane Center
    The system is expected to produce heavy rainfall and flash floods in the eastern Caribbean.
  2. Atlantic tropical cyclones and disturbances, as of 11 a.m. Thursday. National Hurricane Center
    It is projected to pass north of Puerto Rico on Saturday and east of the southeastern Bahamas on Sunday.
  3. Atlantic tropical cyclones and disturbances, as of 5 a.m. Thursday. National Hurricane Center
    The system should stay well east of the United States, according to forecasters.
  4. Tropical Storm Jerry is expected to become reach hurricane status on Friday. National Hurricane Center
    Forecasters expect the storm to reach hurricane status on Friday.
  5. Vehicles splash through heavy water filling Chimney Rock, south of Brays Bayou in Houston, Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019. Officials in the Houston area were preparing high-water vehicles and staging rescue boats Tuesday as Tropical Storm Imelda moved in from the Gulf of Mexico, threatening to dump up to 18 inches of rain in parts of Southeast Texas and southwestern Louisiana over the next few days. MARK MULLIGAN  |  AP
    The main threat from Imelda remained the potential for heavy rainfall and flooding.
  6. The tropical outlook on Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2019. National Hurricane Center
    The depression is expected to become Tropical Storm Jerry by early Wednesday, then strengthen to a hurricane by the weekend.
  7. Hurricane Humberto's projected path as of 5 a.m. Tuesday, according to the National Hurricane Center. National Hurricane Center
    It could become a major hurricane by Tuesday night or Wednesday morning.
  8. The forecast track for Hurricane Humberto, as of 5 a.m. Monday. National Hurricane Center
    The Category 1 hurricane is moving away from the southeastern United States and expected to approach Bermuda by Wednesday night.
  9. Mos Antenor, 42, drives a bulldozer while clearing the road after Hurricane Dorian Mclean's Town, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa) RAMON ESPINOSA  |  AP
    Threatening to exacerbate islands’ problems, Humberto’s rains were falling on Abaco island.
  10. Members of the fire rescue team Task Force 8, from Gainesville, Florida, help remove a body one week after Hurricane Dorian hit The Mudd neighborhood in the Marsh Harbor area of Abaco Island, Bahamas, Monday, Sept. 9, 2019. Dorian, the most powerful hurricane in the northwestern Bahamas' recorded history, has killed at least 44 people in Bahamas as of Sunday, Sept. 8, according to the government. GONZALO GAUDENZI  |  AP
    Many in the northwestern Bahamas, known for its casinos, golf courses and mega yachts, worry they will be forced into deep poverty.
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