Advertisement

Air Force officer, missionaries among wounded

 
This undated photo provided by Chad Wells shows Mormon missionaries Mason Wells, 19, of Sandy, Utah, left, and Joseph Empey, 20, of Santa Clara, Utah. They both were injured in Tuesday's explosion at the Brussels airport. Mormon church officials say missionaries from Utah were seriously injured in the Brussels airport attack. (Joseph Empey/Chad Wells via AP) LA107
This undated photo provided by Chad Wells shows Mormon missionaries Mason Wells, 19, of Sandy, Utah, left, and Joseph Empey, 20, of Santa Clara, Utah. They both were injured in Tuesday's explosion at the Brussels airport. Mormon church officials say missionaries from Utah were seriously injured in the Brussels airport attack. (Joseph Empey/Chad Wells via AP) LA107
Published March 23, 2016

Air Force officer, missionaries among wounded

Several Americans were injured in the terrorist attacks in Brussels on Tuesday, including an Air Force officer and his wife and four children who were at the Brussels Airport when an explosion went off.

The service member is stationed at Joint Force Command Brunssum, in the Netherlands, but the military wouldn't identify him by name. Officials said he was a lieutenant colonel.

Mormon church officials, said three of its missionaries from Utah were seriously injured in the blasts and were hospitalized. They were identified as Richard Norby, 66, of Lehi; Joseph Empey, 20, of Santa Clara; and Mason Wells, 19, of Sandy. They had been serving in Paris and were at the airport with a fourth missionary who was on her way to an assignment in Ohio.

Following the attacks, U.S. European Command announced new prohibitions on unofficial military and Defense Department employee travel to Brussels "until further notice." Official travel to the NATO hub in the city now requires approval.

Social media users share shocked Tintin

A tearful, beloved cartoon adventurer, Tintin, quickly emerged as a symbol of solidarity in the chaotic aftermath of the Brussels bombings as social media users worldwide took to Facebook and other Web streams to check on loved ones potentially in harm's way.

On Twitter, on Insta­gram and elsewhere on the Internet, the red-haired reporter in his signature trench coat with his white dog Snowy — the creations of Belgian cartoonist Herge — were shared as shocked and saddened versions of their usually indomitable and irrepressible selves. Some cartoonists drew "too soon" criticism for depicting the stars of the comic series The Adventures of Tintin — made into a movie in 2011 by Steven Spielberg — as bloodied and battered.

Associated Press