Advertisement
Sheriff Chad Chronister doesn’t have my vote | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Friday’s letters to the editor.
HIllsborough Sheriff Chad Chronister, in a YouTube video, discuss an undercover sting that arrested 11 men he said committed "vile acts." But the men were seeking to have consensual sex with other adults and were arrested on misdemeanor charges that don't involve sex crimes. Critics ask if the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office is criminalizing gay sex.
HIllsborough Sheriff Chad Chronister, in a YouTube video, discuss an undercover sting that arrested 11 men he said committed "vile acts." But the men were seeking to have consensual sex with other adults and were arrested on misdemeanor charges that don't involve sex crimes. Critics ask if the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office is criminalizing gay sex. [ Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office ]
Published Oct. 16, 2020

Arrests in gay sex stings raise questions | Oct. 15

This seals the deal for me

It would seem that Hillsborough Sheriff Chad Chronister is attempting to join our president in name-calling, blaming and shaming. Shame on Sheriff Chronister for public shaming, picking on a particular group of people and putting the information on YouTube! Good thing I do not reside in Hillsborough County, as this would seal the deal for not voting for you.

Tobey Burwick, Dunedin

Florida Police Chiefs Association endorses President Donald Trump

Not all things are political

As a longtime and long ago member of the Florida Police Chiefs Association as police chief in Port St. Lucie and Fort Pierce, I was proud of the non-political positions the organization took on professionalizing law enforcement. I was sickened to see the association endorse a candidate for president. Police chiefs pride themselves on remaining out of politics and this endorsement lowers the bar for all chiefs. Now they can endorse mayoral candidates in cities where the chief does not agree with the mayor. The tax status of the organization, now that they are a political action group, should also be reviewed.

Gil Kerlikowske, Charleston, S.C.

National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Mammograms save lives

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month — a good time to remember that cancer hasn’t stopped for COVID-19. While many of us rightfully delayed mammograms due to immediate COVID-related concerns, medical imaging centers have resumed offering mammograms, and we are taking extra precautions to keep our patients safe.

If you’re a woman age 40 or older, please schedule your annual mammogram and any other preventive health screenings that might have been put on hold due to COVID-19. Delayed diagnosis increases the odds that a cancer will not be found until it is more advanced and less treatable. An accurate and timely diagnosis can make all the difference for your health. For more information on mammograms, visit MammographySavesLives.org.

Bethany Niell, Tampa

The writer is a radiologist at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute in Tampa.

Pursuing virus herd immunity is unethical, global health chief says | Oct. 13

Herd immunity not the strategy

President Donald Trump and his increasingly influential advisor, Dr. Scott Atlas, have promoted “herd immunity” as a strategy to defeat COVID-19 in the United States. The plan is to protect the most vulnerable and abandon all virus precautions for the rest of the population so they can become naturally infected and develop “herd immunity." (It’s unclear how the most vulnerable would be adequately protected in this setting.) This concept is anathema to top public health scientists and to established public health science. It would result in a massive surge of COVID-19 illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths.

A president who is desperate for re-election and is willing to sacrifice not only his own base but also everyone else seizes upon this hare-brained strategy of “herd immunity” for COVID-19 control. At this late stage, it is the only way he can justify his outright defiance of tried-and-true public health strategies to control COVID-19 from the beginning.

Arthur Pitchenik, Miami