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Florida Legislature should keep its nose out of teachers’ business | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Wednesday’s letters to the editor.
Teachers from Pinellas County joined the public school education rally, "Take On Tallahassee," which was organized last year by the Florida Education Association in a call for improved support from Florida lawmakers of public education.
Teachers from Pinellas County joined the public school education rally, "Take On Tallahassee," which was organized last year by the Florida Education Association in a call for improved support from Florida lawmakers of public education. [ SCOTT KEELER | Times ]
Published Feb. 17

Teachers can decide what’s right

Union dues bill on Florida Senate fast track | Feb. 9

I have been teaching for five years in Hillsborough County. This past year has been the hardest yet, and now here comes the state Legislature. When we elect people to represent us, we need them to help solve our problems. But instead of working to address our schools’ and community’s needs, they are pushing Senate Bill 78 to question whether “I know what I am doing” regarding my union membership. I am fully capable of making my own decisions without the government’s interference.

There is no good reason I should have to jump through more hoops when making my own personal decision. Lawmakers should focus on the actual needs of our schools and community and stop wasting time on legislation that helps no one. I am an adult professional charged with the task of educating my county’s children. I can decide what is right for me.

Casey Fraites, Tampa

Enough Marsy’s Law whining

Victims’ rights amendment Marsy’s Law creates too much secrecy | Editorial, Feb. 7, 2020

With a world that sometimes feels like it’s imploding, this rates less than zero on the scale of journalism concerns, but would you please consider giving up on the cut-and-paste of the Marsy’s Law whining on every single accident or incident where officials do not release names? We get it. You don’t like the interpretation of Marsy’s Law. Saying so over and over again does nothing to educate, enlighten or change anything. Do an expose, blast your concerns in an editorial, or just give it a rest. Even for those who may share your concerns, the repetition feels as effective as the toddler’s meltdown in the grocery store candy aisle.

Susan Armagost, Dunedin

Bring back Fairness Doctrine

Honest Abe was the science guy in the White House | Feb. 16

Ted Widmer’s column on science-lover Abe Lincoln was delightful. One of the many nuggets revealed was Lincoln’s appreciation of the importance for the fast, accurate transmission of information, primarily through the use of the telegraph. Today, we recognize the power of communication, but have lost sight of the equal importance of having accurate information. It’s time to bring back the Fairness Doctrine.

Removed during the Reagan administration in 1987, the Fairness Doctrine required holders of broadcast licenses to present controversial issues of public interest in an honest, equitable and balanced manner. Without these guidelines, fact and truth have been drowned out with misinformation and outright lies. Let’s push for the return of transmitting, authentic, fair and balanced information. I wonder which media outlets would fight this effort the most.

Brian Walkowiak, St. Petersburg

What about seniors?

Florida’s $15 minimum wage botched by Legislature | Editorial, Feb 7

If my math is correct $15 an hour for a 2,000 hour work year works out to be $2,500 a month. My Social Security check is no where near that amount. We need to advocate for seniors to get the same minimum.

Michael Bugosh, Sun City Center