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Health care, conscience and an ‘appalling’ Florida bill | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Thursday’s letters to the editor.
Florida Sen. Dennis Baxley has introduced Senate Bill 1820, similar to House Bill 747, which says health care providers could not be sued after employees exercise their “right of conscience” in refusing a service that they say violates their religious, moral or ethical beliefs. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
Florida Sen. Dennis Baxley has introduced Senate Bill 1820, similar to House Bill 747, which says health care providers could not be sued after employees exercise their “right of conscience” in refusing a service that they say violates their religious, moral or ethical beliefs. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack) [ PHELAN M. EBENHACK | AP ]
Published Jan. 27

Asking for a friend

Is health bill about conscience or bias? | Jan. 26

I read with interest the Republican-led bill in the Legislature that would allow doctors and other health care professionals to “act on their conscience” and refuse to treat those patients that they disagree with for religious, moral or ethical reasons. While this proposed bill is appalling, and health care workers respect a higher authority than our current Florida legislators, I do wonder. As many of my colleagues and I “believe” in science, would this new law allow us to refuse to treat those who don’t, especially in regards to COVID-19 vaccination? Just asking for a friend.

Dr. Larry Feinman, Largo

Things that don’t work

State officials bristle at federal stance on monoclonal antibodies | Jan. 26

I see that Gov. Ron DeSantis and Florida’s surgeon general are upset that the federal government does not want to pay to send ineffective monoclonal antibodies to Florida. Don’t worry, there is plenty of hydroxychloroquine and ivermectin around. Just wash it down with a good drink of bleach and we will all be fine.

Dr. James Yoachim, St. Petersburg

Rather like Russia

Not a good example | Editorial, Jan. 25

It is utterly amazing how the heavy-handed oppressive regime in Russia, er, I mean Florida, has forced the top public health official in Orange County from his work in order to “investigate” if he had broken any laws by emailing employees regarding the abysmal vaccination rate in employees. What a lame excuse for placing him on administrative leave but an efficient muzzling of other employees who would rightfully be fearful of speaking up. It is a stark reminder of the smothering dictator-style of governing from Tallahassee.

Tim McClain, St. Pete Beach

Haves to have nots

Blue states pay more than their fair share | Jan. 22

The author’s analysis illustrates that the citizens of blue states earn more per capita than the citizens of red states. Therefore blue states contribute more to the federal flow of dollars to red states with citizens who earn less. In my view, this is the way federal revenue should flow, from the haves to the have nots.

Thomas Klein, Tampa

Save the manatees

Officials: Florida Manatees are eating lettuce in pilot program | Jan. 23

Florida residents are contributing to the deaths of our beloved manatees. Whether you employ a lawn service, or do it yourself, the unnecessary fertilizers and pesticides used end up killing the seagrasses that manatees need. Is your “perfect lawn” more important than the manatee’s existence?

Sylvia Scott, Largo

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