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What would Allies have done in World War II had they known? | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Tuesday’s letters to the editor.
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy examines the site of a recent battle in Bucha, close to Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, Apr. 4, 2022. Russia is facing a fresh wave of condemnation after evidence emerged of what appeared to be deliberate killings of civilians in Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy examines the site of a recent battle in Bucha, close to Kyiv, Ukraine, Monday, Apr. 4, 2022. Russia is facing a fresh wave of condemnation after evidence emerged of what appeared to be deliberate killings of civilians in Ukraine. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky) [ EFREM LUKATSKY | AP ]
Published Apr. 5

Collective action against atrocities

Russian withdrawal reveals horror in Bucha | April 4

How would have the collective citizenry and governments of the World War II Allied countries felt — and more importantly — how would they have acted, if they had known about the barbarism ongoing in the Nazi concentration camps?

Albert C. Hine, Seminole

Sticks and stones

How would the West respond to nuclear attack | April 3

Today we live with nuclear weapons in many countries pointed at each other, more countries developing these weapons, and Vladimir Putin referring to his nuclear arsenal. After World War ll, Albert Einstein was asked what weapons did he think would be used in World War lll. He is said to have answered that he did not know, but he knew the weapons that would be used in World War lV. His answer, “sticks and stones.” We certainly seem to be moving in that direction.

Stephen J. Micklo, Clearwater

Required reading

Nixon’s example of sanity in Washington | Column, April 4

Peggy Noonan’s column is insightful in that it is a brief history lesson on the passing of rule in our democratic system. I read her column from top to the end and thought the following: While this article was very important and relevant to our democratic government function, I don’t believe anyone at the Jan. 6 insurrection would read such an article or even understand the significance. This column is important, but it will never reach the other side. It possessed clarity of reason, which I believe is also missing on that side.

Peter Castelli, Tampa

Another distraction

Some road signs are dangerous

Phone down. It’s the law, they say. But do we need a big digital road sign to remind us of this? I think most certainly not. One in four car accidents in the United States is due to texting and driving. Of course, officials want to embed this in our minds, but certainly there are other ways than giant, sometimes flashing road signs. You cannot drive safely unless the task of driving has your full attention, right? But looking up at a big “don’t text and drive” sign is just as distracting as glancing up your cell phone. For our safety and the safety of others, I’m sure we can find other ways to remind people to not text and drive. After all, safety is important and limiting the distractions while driving is a good priority.

K.J. James, Largo

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