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The Sunshine State? Let’s become the solar power state | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Tuesday’s letters to the editor.
Rick Walker, vice president of FACTS engineering, walks through the company’s array of 677 solar energy panels on March 3, 2022, at the company’s 60,000-square foot design, engineering and manufacturing facility in New Port Richey. Walker said the building has zero net energy consumption, meaning the total amount of energy used by the building on an annual basis is roughly equal to the amount of renewable energy created on the site.
Rick Walker, vice president of FACTS engineering, walks through the company’s array of 677 solar energy panels on March 3, 2022, at the company’s 60,000-square foot design, engineering and manufacturing facility in New Port Richey. Walker said the building has zero net energy consumption, meaning the total amount of energy used by the building on an annual basis is roughly equal to the amount of renewable energy created on the site. [ DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times ]
Published May 10

The solar power state

Why are we fighting sunshine and letting Florida’s energy market fail? | Column, May 9

Columnist David Jenkins lays out sound reasons why it is counter-intuitive for the politicians of the “Sunshine State” to kneel before the feet of the major utilities on solar energy. As a practical matter, the more decentralized the power grid, the less impact communities will suffer after a major weather event. Localized pockets of solar power would create numerous energy oases that could help mitigate regional blackouts. If local governing bodies, emergency services, businesses, and homeowners supplemented their energy needs with solar, cold-food storage losses, for example, would be reduced, and that is just one benefit. Let’s do what we can to exploit the sunshine we Floridians take so much for granted.

Brian Walkowiak, St. Petersburg

Fetal tax credit

What about the 63 million babies aborted in the U.S.? | Column, May 6

The IRS has always maintained that a tax exemption for a dependent is created at the time of birth. If Roe v. Wade is overturned, won’t they have to recognize the dependent at the time of conception? My pro-life friends need to be consistent.

Tony Delcavo, Bradenton

The Good Samaritan

Fla. targets hospital costs for people in U.S. illegally | May 7

I regret that the current governor of Florida does not have empathy for human beings who are in need of medical care no matter how they arrived in our state. The parable of the Good Samaritan encourages us to have mercy. It is disappointing that he does not appear to share this belief.

Carol Stefany, Tampa

The meaning of ‘life’

What about the 63 million babies aborted in the U.S.? | Column, May 6

I consider myself pro-life. However, “life” does not just narrowly mean the chance to exist, to take a first breath. It also refers to the decades and decades that a person may continue to breathe. I do consider abortion barbaric, and that those lives snuffed out would surely have included persons living exemplary lives contributing to mankind. However, by definition, those 63 million children were unwanted, some conceived under or into horrendous circumstances. Even if unaware that they were unwanted by their parents for whatever reason, would the dynamics involved in their upbringing and lives give them the same chance for a happy and responsible life as those who were wanted? Would 63 million adoptive parents have been willing to step up and raise these children?

Diana Kelley, Tampa

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