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Integration and desegregation are different | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Friday’s letters to the editor.
Members of the "Classes of 1970" in St. Petersburg pose for a group photo during a reunion on May 14, 2022, at the Club at Treasure Island. Attendees recalled being uprooted from all-Black Gibbs High during the 1969-70 school year and sent to predominantly white schools as part of a desegregation plan imposed on the Pinellas County school district.
Members of the "Classes of 1970" in St. Petersburg pose for a group photo during a reunion on May 14, 2022, at the Club at Treasure Island. Attendees recalled being uprooted from all-Black Gibbs High during the 1969-70 school year and sent to predominantly white schools as part of a desegregation plan imposed on the Pinellas County school district. [ HANNAH CRITCHFIELD | Times ]
Published May 20

What desegregation isn’t

Split by integration, all-Black class stays connected | May 18

Thank you for the story on the all-Black “Classes of 1970” in St. Petersburg. It’s a shame that school administrators and civil rights groups never learned the definition of desegregation, which is simply the opposite of segregation. They mistakenly believed it was integration, and it was forced on these alumni of Gibbs High School when most didn’t want it. All that was legally required was the elimination of the dual systems that existed, but historically Black schools were sacrificed. Worse, as the article points out, many students’ academic performance declined as a result of being bused to hostile environments at other schools. We can only hope this sad history doesn’t repeat itself.

Joseph Brown, Tampa

My solar story

Gov. DeSantis gets it right on Florida’s rooftop solar | Editorial, April 29

I applaud Gov. Ron DeSantis’ decision to veto the bill that would have raised the energy bills of people using solar power by cutting what they are paid for electricity their panels feed into the grid. I have just had solar panels installed at a personal cost of over $22,000, so I was very happy to see his veto.

But I have just had my first bill from Duke Energy since our solar panels started working. We are being billed $17.55, despite producing more energy that we have used. Why? The bill states that I have a $17.55 “minimum bill adjustment.” So is Duke Energy charging me for not using their electricity? In what other universe does this exist? If I go into a shop and decline to buy anything, can the shopkeeper then tell me that I owe him/her $17.55 for not buying anything?

My advice? Nationalize the utilities. Energy creation belongs to the state, not private companies.

John Starkey, South Pasadena

Careful what you wish for

Taking aim at libel laws | May 19

Legislators who may consider toying with the idea of making it easier to sue their critics for libel should consider that what’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. Many people may look forward to taking Fox News to court. And as for former President Donald Trump returning to Twitter...

Gregory McColm, Temple Terrace

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