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On abortion and human rights, will the country move forward? Or backward? | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Tuesday’s letters to the editor.
In response to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, the Johnson County Democratic Party and Kansas Democrats hosted a demonstration Sunday in Johnson County near College Blvd. and Roe Ave., to demand defense of reproductive freedoms in Kansas. Participants called on Republican candidate Amanda Adkins to stand up for a person's right to choose and defend reproductive freedoms. The decision overturned 50 years of precedent and allows states to restrict access to essential health care.
In response to the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, the Johnson County Democratic Party and Kansas Democrats hosted a demonstration Sunday in Johnson County near College Blvd. and Roe Ave., to demand defense of reproductive freedoms in Kansas. Participants called on Republican candidate Amanda Adkins to stand up for a person's right to choose and defend reproductive freedoms. The decision overturned 50 years of precedent and allows states to restrict access to essential health care. [ RICH SUGG/RSUGG@KCSTAR.COM | Kansas City Star ]
Published Jun. 28

Forward or backward?

Voices rise on both sides | June 27

The Supreme Court decision puts us at a decision-point regarding human rights. The competing arguments turn on the 14th Amendment and what it said about rights in 1868. The backward-looking perspective says look only back, way before 1868, to rights “deeply rooted in this nation’s history.” Rely upon the eyes of men who did not allow women to vote, who let children work in factories and many of whom recently owned slaves.

The forward-looking argument is inspired by the powerful words of the amendment itself, including “liberty,” “equal protection” and freedom from laws that “abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens.” The words are powerful but also broad, to include further rights that could not be imagined then. Since 1868, new rights been recognized, like the right for all citizens to vote, for children to have childhoods, for families to be free of domestic violence and for every person to be free to live and to love who they want. America will decide whether our rights should continue forward, or be turned backward.

Tom Sanocki, Plant City

Women should incorporate

Voices rise on both sides | June 27

Since a past ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court stated that corporations are people and has, in effect, afforded more rights to corporations than to women of child-bearing age, women should form corporations and claim their reproductive parts as manufacturing assets of that corporation. This way, their reproductive rights would be protected from intrusive state laws, including decisions on how those assets will be used.

Brian Walkowiak, St. Petersburg

Vote in the primaries

GOP may win the midterms, but it can’t hang on to power | Column, June 23

We Americans blame the parties for the politicians we elect, but we’re the ones who elect them. Sure, in the general elections we may not have a decent choice, but there’s a simple solution: Vote in the primaries. That’s where the parties make their nominations. Turnout is much lower, so your vote counts for much more.

Gregory McColm, Temple Terrace

Rally for the environment

Stepping Out with Pride | June 26

The turnout of 310,000 people at the St. Pete Pride Parade on Saturday was awesome. How can we have such huge, enthusiastic rallies throughout our country for the environment? I believe it’s what we need to make it clear to legislators that we expect them to finally get serious about the existential threat of climate change and the dire effects it is already having on people, especially those who are marginalized. Numbers do matter!

Anne Burnham, Palm Harbor

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