)
Advertisement
The Jan. 6 committee proudly shows the diversity of America | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Tuesday’s letters to the editor.
From left, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., staff counsel Dan George, Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., Vice Chair Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., staff counsel Candyce Phoenix, Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., and Rep. Elaine Luria, D-Va., sit on the dais as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
From left, Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., staff counsel Dan George, Rep. Stephanie Murphy, D-Fla., Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss., Vice Chair Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., staff counsel Candyce Phoenix, Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., and Rep. Elaine Luria, D-Va., sit on the dais as the House select committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol holds a hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 12, 2022. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File) [ J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE | AP ]
Published Jul. 19

A reflection of America

The moments resonating from the Jan. 6 hearings so far | June 20

This article on the Jan. 6 committee is informative, but it fails to note one obvious thing: diversity. Among the panel members on Day 7 were Reps. Stephanie Murphy, an Asian American; Bennie Thompson, an African American; Liz Cheney, a white American; and Jamie Raskin, a Jewish American — a magnificent reflection of America. Despite the setbacks and challenges to the rule of law, this country has made progress where people of different colors, ethnicities and religions are in Congress today when they would not have been 50 years ago.

Jade Wu, Naples

All aboard this boondoggle

SunRunner, first bus rapid transit line in Tampa Bay, is opening in October | July 14

I’ll type slow so it’s easier to understand. The greater St. Petersburg area is not Chicago or New York or Washington, D.C. ( feel free to fill in your favorite megalopolis). Your favorite big city has sophisticated mass transit, but we ain’t them. Set aside those Tampa commuters, and if St. Petersburgers can’t drive somewhere in 15 minutes, we don’t go. So sinking a bucketful of federal cash into the SunRunner to shuttle some tourists from downtown to the beach is just a boondoggle, plain and simple.

Mark H. Campbell, St. Petersburg

Not just the bridge

It’s getting there | July 17

Having driven over the Howard Frankland Bridge recently, I get the feeling that it’s not bridge congestion going south and not even the new construction on land, but once you get past all that and hit the Gandy intersection, that traffic gets congested and slows for about 2 miles. It’s always been like that. There’s the bottleneck.

David Lubin, Tampa

Here’s the real point

I’m a gay retired professor who fears the ugly revival of ‘hate the sin, love the sinner’ | Perspective, July 17

Professor William Felice makes valid points about the return of repressive laws discriminating against the LGBTQ community. The “parental rights” bill was Gov. Ron DeSantis’ baby, and he is proud of it. The parental rights bill was a two-for. Not only does it impact the gay community, but it was also a not-so-subtle attack on public schools. Although the governor signed the bill surrounded by children, those charter school children were not even covered under his “protecting children” bill, which applies only to traditional public schools. I believe its primary focus is to expose public schools to potential lawsuits and weaken their position in society.

Brian Walkowiak, St. Petersburg

Advertisement

This site no longer supports your current browser. Please use a modern and up-to-date browser version for the best experience.

Chrome Firefox Safari Edge