Advertisement
With Greenland’s zombie ice melt, Pinellas beaches will probably disappear anyway | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Wednesday’s letters to the editor.
A boat navigates at night next to large icebergs in eastern Greenland on Aug. 15, 2019. Zombie ice from the massive Greenland ice sheet will eventually raise global sea level by at least 10 inches on its own, according to a study released Monday. Zombie or doomed ice is still attached to thicker areas of ice, but it’s no longer getting fed by those larger glaciers.
A boat navigates at night next to large icebergs in eastern Greenland on Aug. 15, 2019. Zombie ice from the massive Greenland ice sheet will eventually raise global sea level by at least 10 inches on its own, according to a study released Monday. Zombie or doomed ice is still attached to thicker areas of ice, but it’s no longer getting fed by those larger glaciers. [ FELIPE DANA | AP ]
Published Aug. 31

The sands of time

Zombie ice from Greenland will raise sea level 10 inches or more, study says | Aug. 30

The article on the now-inescapable rise of sea level due to melting Greenland ice puts all the brouhaha about Pinellas County beach “renourishment” into perspective, doesn’t it? No amount of dredging sand from the Gulf of Mexico to heap it onto the beaches will stop this, or change the fate of our barrier islands. The average elevation of many of those islands is about 3 feet above mean sea level. Ten inches or more rise in sea level could put much of the current beach under water. Private or public, one of our key assets is going to disappear.

Jerry Nepon-Sixt, Tampa

Nov. 8 as independents’ day

Is Florida still a swing state? | Aug.30

The analysis of likely voters in the November election seemed to miss the elephant in the room: independents. Twenty-seven percent of all Florida voters are independents. That means they have no party affiliation, although they may lean one way or the other. How they vote this November could very well determine which party wins each elected office.

Larry Silver, Oldsmar

My party left me

We have a GOP that can’t grow with Trump, but also can’t grow without him | Column, Aug. 25

I am an older, patriotic American and I am angry. I feel betrayed, like a jilted lover. For 60 years I have been a deeply committed member of the Republican Party. During this long relationship, there were times we didn’t always agree. There were even times when I was embarrassed. But there was a long list of things, important things — principles — that we were for. Yes, not just against, things that we were actually for. Things like small government; conservative economics and a balanced budget; support for the rule of law, justice and our police; devotion to the Constitution of the United States; and above all, truth. Just look at how we handled Watergate. We did the right thing. We were committed to truth even when it was costly, even when it hurt. After all these years, I discover that the Republican Party is no longer committed to any of these things. The GOP has betrayed my trust and traded all these precious principles for cheap imitations: political expediency and power. It has become an ugly embarrassment. And now I find myself broken-hearted and alone with no roots, no political home and no place to go. What is a principled conservative to do? That’s why I am angry.

Charles Coflin, Seminole

Advertisement

This site no longer supports your current browser. Please use a modern and up-to-date browser version for the best experience.

Chrome Firefox Safari Edge