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There is no safe level of exposure to diesel exhaust | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Tuesday’s letters to the editor.
There is no safe level of exposure to diesel exhaust.
There is no safe level of exposure to diesel exhaust.
Published Sep. 6

The danger of exhaust

California’s gas car ban is clunky. There’s a better way | Washington Post editorial, Sept. 1.

My profession entails investigating worker health concerns, including exposure to diesel and gas engine combustion products. Vehicle emissions pose a significant health threat. There is no safe level of exposure to diesel exhaust. Truck drivers, firefighters, school bus drivers and others are exposed and suffer health consequences such as asthma, cancer and heart disease. Smog and soot air pollution caused by trucks and buses are among the greatest threats to public health for the more than 45 million people in the U.S. living within 300 feet of a major roadway or transportation facility. The EPA needs the strongest possible standards for heavy duty vehicles to ensure a 90% NOx reduction by 2027 and establish a clear roadmap to 100% zero-emission vehicles by 2035.

Max Kiefer, St. Augustine

A solution to a non-problem

California’s gas car ban is clunky. There’s a better way | Washington Post editorial, Sept. 1

Some 12 years ago I predicted that within 10 years the internal combustion engine would go the way of the horse and buggy. I don’t claim to be clairvoyant; it just made sense. The argument concerning banning gas guzzlers is a moot point. By the year 2035 there will be few gas-powered cars on the road making the law redundant. It looks like a solution to a nonexisting problem.

James Mootsey, Dunedin

New Yorkers pay attention

Deadlier than NYC to cross a road here | Editorial, Sept. 4

This editorial failed to recognize a few things about New York City. New Yorkers are far more educated pedestrians because we know we will get run over if we don’t look before crossing. Cars are speeding down the roads as they are here, but it’s the pedestrians who are more aware. Same for drivers, a taxi will hit you if you don’t drive properly because they don’t care about accidents. They have their own body shops. New York is a busy place so everyone is more aware than Floridians.

More crosswalks and more lighting in Tampa Bay will help, but the region also needs a campaign to educate pedestrians and cyclists on safety. There are many accidents that are the fault of the pedestrian, and that is what needs to change. Always blaming drivers who speed is not going to help reduce fatalities unless we recognize that there are many other factors that need to be addressed. Our school systems can be the first line of defense in educating our children on traffic safety.

Bill Rosenberg, Bradenton

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