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I got tired of Florida’s ‘freedoms,’ so I moved to California | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Monday’s letters to the editor.
Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at a press conference in Miami on Sept. 7.
Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at a press conference in Miami on Sept. 7. [ SYDNEY WALSH | Miami Herald ]
Published Sep. 12

California, there I went

Florida’s tough COVID summer. Now what? | Editorial, Sept. 11

Following retirement in January I packed up my Gulfport home and moved to California after 20 years in the Tampa Bay area. Having endured eight years of Rick Scott and having already seen enough of Florida “freedom” under Gov. Ron DeSantis’ ultra-political pandemic response, I was not surprised that Florida was No. 1 in deaths per capita of the most populous states since vaccines became widely available.

In the end while I loved the Florida winters and the many benefits of Florida life, I choose to no longer accept the drama — political drama — that is inflicted upon Floridians daily. In this case that drama continues to evidence itself in the deaths of more Floridians. What the people Florida are witnessing with DeSantis is an un-woke political ideology devoid of common sense. Yes, folks, as the statistics in this editorial bear out, there are a lot of other states that care a lot more about keeping you alive. And, personally, I would much rather be a living member of a collective society than a dead rugged Florida individualist.

Gary Foley, Oceanside, California

Here’s a new name

Are we deeply divided? | Perspective, Sept. 11

It occurs to me that we need a new political acronym: “CINO.” It would stand for “conservative in name only.” The champion of this group is our own Gov. Ron DeSantis. He claims to ascribe to conservative principles, especially limited government and individual freedom. Yet, he bullied several high school students who made the personal choice to wear a mask. In addition, he has promoted legislation to have the state government dictate and monitor what school teachers can and cannot teach and how businesses can train their employees. He touts small government only when it involves issues with which he feels comfortable. When he sees a political advantage to pursue an issue, he has no doubts about wielding the power and resources of big government.

Richard C. Horowitz, Palm Harbor

Higher tax bills for newcomers

Here’s why some Tampa Bay homeowners pay far more in taxes than their neighbors | Sept. 9

I believe that property values have skyrocketed because outsiders are moving here. So why shouldn’t they be the ones paying the bulk of property tax increases this year? This is the same philosophy as impact fees: those causing the impact are the ones who pay for it. I am losing no sleep knowing that homeowners who were already here are largely shielded from these increases.

Mike Munger, St. Petersburg

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