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It should be easier to donate produce to food banks to help Hurricane Ian victims | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Saturday’s letters to the editor.
Volunteers with the Metropolitan Ministries World Central kitchen prepare sandwiches that will go to Hurricane Ian survivors in Southwest Florida, Friday, Sept. 30, 2022, in Tampa.
Volunteers with the Metropolitan Ministries World Central kitchen prepare sandwiches that will go to Hurricane Ian survivors in Southwest Florida, Friday, Sept. 30, 2022, in Tampa. [ CHRIS O'MEARA | AP ]
Published Oct. 1

Giving my food away

Where to donate or volunteer to help Hurricane Ian victims | Sept. 29

I just got to experience how difficult it is to donate food. I grow some fruit, and my neighbor has an enormous avocado tree. Ahead of Hurricane Ian I cut branches overhanging my fence and ended up with an enormous amount of avocados. After giving them away to friends and neighbors I still had about two 5-gallon buckets of soon to ripen avocados and am about to fly out of Tampa on an extended trip.

A nearby food pantry that may have taken them was closed all week due to the storm. I spent a fair bit of time online looking for food pantries, etc., that explicitly state they’ll accept produce and found none. “Donate” links almost exclusively take visitors to information about monetary donations. Frustrating

Ultimately I called St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church in Holiday, which runs a food pantry and they graciously agreed to accept the food. It turns out that they feed 100 to 150 people a week.

We have a number of food pantries and similar organizations in the Tampa Bay area. How many of us grow or have neighbors who grow avocados, mangos, citrus, etc., where the excess ends up rotting on the ground or otherwise wasted? Food pantries, please advertise that you accept fruits and vegetables. The rest of us? Let’s find them and donate.

Matt Horvath, Tarpon Springs

An inexact science

Ian’s three early lessons for Tampa Bay | Editorial, Sept. 30

Clearly, hurricane forecasting remains an inexact science. However, I find it ironic that the same profession which admits this also claims to be able to predict what the sea level will be in 30 years.

David Mokotoff, St. Petersburg

Partisan time-keeping

Fault-finding | Letter, Sept. 30

So that I can set my watch, can the letter writer tell me when Fox News, etc., will blame Hurricane Ian on President Joe Biden?

Carlos J. DeCisneros, Tampa

Affecting the election

Hurricane Ian will affect voting. Florida needs to make it easier right now. | Column, Sept. 30

Doing a quick and dirty overview of the path of destruction Hurricane Ian, it looks to me as it was definitely skewed towards heavily Republican counties. It would seem as though the voter suppression measures enacted by our state Legislature could significantly affect the outcome of close statewide elections, such as governor and U.S. Senate. Time will tell if those plans all backfire.

Richard Friedman, St. Petersburg

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