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Florida doesn’t have to be a ‘miasma of white supremacists’ and ‘predatory capitalists’ | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Sunday’s letters to the editor.
Anthime Gionet, wearing sunglasses, known online as Baked Alaska, lives in Pinellas County, where he hosts a livestream show that spreads antisemitic and racist rhetoric.
Anthime Gionet, wearing sunglasses, known online as Baked Alaska, lives in Pinellas County, where he hosts a livestream show that spreads antisemitic and racist rhetoric. [ PATRICK GORSKI | ZUMAPRESS.com ]
Published Oct. 2

He’s a Jan. 6 defendant, a racist livestreamer and a new Tampa Bay resident | Sept. 24

March of folly

Scanning the news last weekend, one might surmise that Florida is inherently home to a miasma of white supremacists, drug-addled ne’er-do-wells and predatory capitalists. No doubt, stories of these and other phenomena are ever-present features of life in the Sunshine State. It’s worth reminding ourselves, however, that flourishing social ills are not a product of natural development, our tropical gene pool or circumstance. Florida’s culture has been deliberately shaped by forces of a political ecosystem that values commercial profit, disenfranchisement and inequity at every turn. So-called “epidemics” of drug addiction, mental distress, housing shortage and poverty are not the fruit of inevitable social evolution but the product of calculated interventions of power.

Under the familiar guises of unbounded capitalism, liberty and justice, the patsies of this ruse, our citizens, march dutifully into a future of affluence and influence for a relative handful. Don’t call it an epidemic. It’s our policy in Florida.

Finn Kavanagh, Tampa

He’s a Jan. 6 defendant, a racist livestreamer and a new Tampa Bay resident | Sept. 24

Haters unwelcome

One might ask our governor why it is that the “haters” are so comfortable here in Florida. “A place where we don’t have to listen to what woman and Jews tell us” are not the words of a person or a group that any state should welcome. Spewing hate is never something that should be welcome.

Tobey Burwick, Dunedin

Are we deeply divided? Or just poorly represented? | Column, Sept. 8

3.6% is all it takes

We are poorly represented because politicians have realized they only need to appeal to a very small minority of the population to get elected. That is also why politicians have become so extreme. Each major party’s candidate only needs 3.6% of the population to vote for them in the primary to get on the ballot. Once on the ballot, they need only to convince voters that they are a less-bad choice than the other candidates.

The math is simple. The population of Florida is 21,538,187. Sixty-seven percent are registered to vote — 14,452,123 people, according to the state elections office. Primary turnout is 30% (or less) — 4,335,637 people. Voters can only vote in their party’s primary. Thirty-six percent are Republicans (35% are Democrats) — 1,560,829 people. Though some races are won with less than 50% of the vote, let’s use the just over 50% necessary to win some contests — 780,415. That’s only 3.6% of the population!

Nicholas Terranova, Lutz

What readers are saying about Gov. DeSantis and the Martha’s Vineyard immigrants | Letters, Sept. 22

A simple reason

Once again a critic of illegal immigration failed to include, what I feel, is the main reason for illegal immigration. They would not come here if the hospitality, restaurant and construction industries would not hire them illegally.

Carlos J. DeCisneros, Tampa

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