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Hurricane Ian huffed and it puffed but didn’t blow these houses down — or flood them | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Wednesday’s letters to the editor.
 
When his development was under way, Syd Kitson, CEO of real estate developer Kitson & Partners, signed his name on one of the 350,000 Florida Power & Light solar panels that will help power the Kitson-inspired new town of Babcock Ranch, set between Fort Myers and Punta Gorda. The first residents moved in nearly five years ago to what is billed as the nation’s first solar-powered town.
When his development was under way, Syd Kitson, CEO of real estate developer Kitson & Partners, signed his name on one of the 350,000 Florida Power & Light solar panels that will help power the Kitson-inspired new town of Babcock Ranch, set between Fort Myers and Punta Gorda. The first residents moved in nearly five years ago to what is billed as the nation’s first solar-powered town.
Published Oct. 19, 2022

Huffing and puffing

Our coastal swamps could save us; Hurricane Ian left millions of gallons of spilled wastewater, dirty runoff in its wake | Oct. 16

We’ve all heard the “three little pigs” story about a sturdy home surviving the big blow. But where’s the story about a home surviving a big flood — other than Noah’s ark in the Bible? Flooding is a huge problem in Florida — and always will be: Times staff writer Max Chesnes’ reality check about flooding wastewater gushing into our homes, Diane Roberts’ clever critique of Florida’s malignant hyperdevelopment, and professor Bobby Fokidis’ lullaby plea begging developers not to drain our swamps may fall on deaf ears. But you know what? There’s a smart piggy tale somewhere in all this mess: Syd Kitson’s Babcock Ranch creates an exemplary model for Florida’s future with its solar-powered community with underground power lines and retaining ponds that keep houses from flooding. Kitson’s homes not only withstand big blows. Kitson’s homes withstand biblical proportion floods. And that, dear readers, is a story worth telling.

Ginger Goepper, Treasure Island

I’d said no if I could

Largo should explore the sale of its old landfill site | Editorial, Oct. 6

If I lived in Largo I would vote against referendum 2, which would allow the city to negotiate the sale of a former landfill to become a massive recreation center. Why would I want to go kayaking in a fake lagoon when we have so many beautiful waterfront natural spaces to do so? Also, the Largo Central Park Nature Preserve is a haven for native wildlife as well as migratory birds. Every time I’ve been there, there are always others there walking, or cycling and enjoying the quiet atmosphere. The owls, hawks, wading birds and songbirds that call that area home will be directly impacted. Once this area is lost, we will never be able to get it back.

Cecelia Dumois, St. Petersburg

The road to Damascus?

How Hurricane Ian changed the Florida governor’s race | Oct. 13

Gov. Ron DeSantis should be praised for having had the decency and the courage to reverse himself when the interests of the state were at stake. Faced by the consequences of a major hurricane, he did not hesitate to solicit that federal government aid that as a congressman he denied to New York and New Jersey. Should we conclude that he has a conscience, that he is ready to acknowledge that until now he kept the citizens of Florida hostage to his political ambitions? Under his administration, I believe that the average Floridian has become poorer, sicker and at increased risk of dying.

Lodovico Balducci, Tampa