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Letter writers explain how white privilege works | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Thursday’s letters to the editor.
U.S. deputy marshals escort 6-year-old Ruby Bridges from William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, La., in November 1960.  The first-grader was the only Black child enrolled in the school, where parents of white students boycotted the court-ordered integration law and took their children out of school.
U.S. deputy marshals escort 6-year-old Ruby Bridges from William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, La., in November 1960. The first-grader was the only Black child enrolled in the school, where parents of white students boycotted the court-ordered integration law and took their children out of school.
Published Dec. 8, 2022

Let me explain

What is this white privilege? | Letter, Dec. 2

I shall attempt to assist the letter writer who asked, “Please help me find my white privilege.” The GI Bill was supposed to be afforded to all returning vets, but Black veterans weren’t able to make use of the housing provisions of the GI Bill because banks generally wouldn’t make loans for mortgages in Black neighborhoods, and African-Americans were excluded from the suburbs by a combination of deed covenants and informal racism. Try being a Black soldier coming home from World War II or Korea and wanting to get a drink in a segregated bar or eat in a segregated restaurant. I don’t recall any strange white fruit hanging from trees either. I’d say that’s some really powerful white privilege.

Georgianna Woernle, Floral City

My childhood experience

What is this white privilege? | Letter, Dec. 2

In an effort to help the letter writer understand this concept, I offer the following vignette. During the mid-1950s I was a small child with my mother at a drug store on Central Avenue and needed to use the restroom. She took me to the men’s room and waited for me. I was just learning to read and looked up at the restroom signs: Men, Women, Colored. I was confused because I’d been told that boys and girls used different bathrooms in public. I asked my mother why did they make Black boys and girls use the same bathrooms in public? “That’s wrong!” I proclaimed. My mother, who was not from the South, looked at me sadly and replied, “You’re right. They shouldn’t make them do that.” Only later did it occur to me that there was no logical reason for people of color to be using separate bathrooms in the first place. This is how I became “woke” at a very young age and continue to proudly wear the label.

Alvin G. Wood, Haslett, Michigan

See, there it is

What is this white privilege? | Letter, Dec. 2

A letter writer says he haven’t been a beneficiary of white privilege. I beg to differ. He states he has received “about half a dozen traffic tickets” “probably deserved.” On any of those occasions were he or his car searched? Was he handcuffed? Was he arrested and taken to jail? Was he ever stopped because the color of his skin did not match that of the inhabitants of the neighborhood he was driving in? No? Welcome to the world of white privilege.

Roberta Barr, Port Richey