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The November letter of the month: Sex ed vs. active shooter drills | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Saturday’s letters to the editor.
Members of the audience listen to locals speak to Claudia Isom, an independent hearing officer, at the Hillsborough County school district headquarters on Nov. 17, 2022 in Tampa.
Members of the audience listen to locals speak to Claudia Isom, an independent hearing officer, at the Hillsborough County school district headquarters on Nov. 17, 2022 in Tampa. [ JEFFEREE WOO | Times ]
Published Dec. 10, 2022

Sex ed vs. active shooter drills

November letter of the month

Editor’s note: The November letter of the month reacted to the story that was headlined “Dozens show up to oppose sex education curriculum.”

I can’t help but wonder if these are the same people who support abortion bans and the politicians who enact them. I hope they’re remembering that this is the age group that will be affected by laws that force unwanted pregnancy and birth on children, as we have seen happen in Ohio and elsewhere. If kids are forced into giving birth, they better know what causes it so they can understand what they are doing or what is being done to them. How could it possibly be OK for us to accept the necessity of active shooter drills for this age and younger, but not OK to teach science and fact-based biology? Anyone who is “anti-abortion” should be strongly in favor or teaching kids about sex, contraception, and the repercussions. Why not consider this the equivalent of an active shooter drill for unwanted pregnancy?

Vivienne Handy, Wimauma

Surreality trumps transparency

DeSantis urged to release plans | Dec. 9

The Florida Department of Children and Families released a statement saying there is a plan in place for what will happen when expanded Medicaid benefits put in place during the pandemic end, but why didn’t these officials release the plan instead of a statement about the plan? And if the plan is in “place,” where is this place? As far as I can tell, the department has replaced transparency with surreality and now considers its work done.

Elizabeth Corwin, Tampa

More transparency troubles

Tampa Lobbied for Law Changes | Dec. 7

I am greatly concerned by the lack of transparency exhibited by the Tampa city administration, as revealed yet again in Times Staff Writer Charlie Frago’s article. From lobbying to contracting to public meetings, the mayor and her staff seem to see themselves above public scrutiny. This is particularly troubling in the strong mayoral system employed in Tampa with a limited and constrained role for Tampa City Council (which some have alleged is subject to bullying by the mayor).

Tampa citizens can play an important role in keeping elected officials accountable, but we must know the truth about decisions being taken and funds being spent on their behalf. It has become fashionable of late for the city to deploy multiple contractors for various public engagement efforts but sincerity and honesty from the mayor and her staff are what is really needed. Honest, reasonable dialogue with the public is a minimum we should expect from city leadership and timely responses to legitimate questions.

Caryle Cammisa, Tampa