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I’m a doctor and Florida Surgeon General Ladapo is dead wrong on COVID vaccines | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Friday’s letters to the editor.
 
Florida Surgeon General Joseph Ladapo is calling for people to stop getting mRNA COVID vaccines over safety concerns that the shots could possibly deliver DNA contaminants into human cells, a view at odds with mainstream medical science.
Florida Surgeon General Joseph Ladapo is calling for people to stop getting mRNA COVID vaccines over safety concerns that the shots could possibly deliver DNA contaminants into human cells, a view at odds with mainstream medical science. [ JOSE A IGLESIAS | El Nuevo Herald ]
Published Jan. 5

A doctor disagrees

Fla. surgeon general against COVID vaccines. FDA disagrees. | Jan. 4

Florida Surgeon General Joseph Ladapo exposes political mischief posing as scientific thought. You would think that his Harvard education would mean something, but sometimes applicants like Ladapo are admitted since their thinking post-grad cannot be evaluated prior to their acceptance. Gov. Ron DeSantis has a political ax to grind with the current state-of-the-art science but should not allow his lackey to pose as a medical expert when Ladapo’s positions are disconnected from the vast majority of expert medical authorities concerning COVID vaccines and, by association, any other medical assertions Ladapo might try to promulgate in the future. By the way, I am a medical doctor who has had all his COVID shots/boosters, as have most of my colleagues.

Lawrence Goldberg, Gulfport

Where’s his evidence?

Fla. surgeon general against COVID vaccines. FDA disagrees. | Jan. 4

Florida Surgeon General Dr. Joseph Ladapo claims that COVID mRNA vaccines could possibly deliver DNA contaminants into human cells and recommends that people not get them. Ladapo doubled down on his concerns Wednesday, saying that the “FDA’s response does not provide data or evidence.” Yet he provides none either. While hundreds of millions of COVID vaccines have been administered around the world, you don’t hear about people dying from the vaccine, while it is this very vaccine that helped to end the pandemic. It is not only dangerous, but reckless for a surgeon general to make the claim that citizens should not receive something that might save their lives, especially if they have an autoimmune condition. Government intervention into personal health care is intrusive, especially when making generalizations with either cherry-picked or no scientific evidence. I find it appalling and shameful that one man has created fear and concern over a studied, tested and life-saving vaccine.

Jackie Kanner, St. Petersburg

Cash, not comfort

Bill protects cash sales | Jan. 4

On the surface, it makes sense that since our lives are complicated, we reach for comfort. But understanding there are consequences to every decision allows some to gain wisdom. Bravo to the Legislature’s bipartisan sanity in the bill to require businesses to accept currency. The paper form actually states, “legal tender for all debts public and private.” What the 41% who use only plastic don’t consider is the consequence of digital-only payments, beyond the minute saved at checkout. We already have a monetary system that devalues the dollar to finance debt, enabled by politicians who always seem to stay one step ahead of inflation. Cashless shoppers see no connection between the ease with which the government torches our dollar’s value and their financial state. They just blame the other side for not being able to pay their bills. The convenience of paying for $5 coffees with a tap of a card is dwarfed by the government’s mindset that it needs to push a controllable, programmable digital dollar on us. Don’t make your ignorance of the facts ruin the lives of those who’ve chosen to care. We should all protect our money more responsibly.

Jason Barrera, Oldsmar

Freedom of choice

Bill protects cash sales | Jan. 4

I see the Legislature is preparing to protect consumers who prefer and use cash for their transactions. That seems like a no-brainer for all the reasons outlined in the article — a clear matter of freedom of choice. I might suggest that they amend the bill to also outlaw businesses charging “convenience” fees for using credit cards to make purchases.

Harley Lofton, Palm Harbor

The call for cash

Bill protects cash sales | Jan. 4

I was in a small local eatery waiting for my phoned-in order. I overheard the owner lamenting about paying 3% on every credit sale. For a small business that can be significant. At the same time, I see the advantage for any business being cashless: no registers, no employees skimming cash or making the wrong change, no incentive to rob a business if all it has is receipts, no keeping change to give back to customers. Many businesses prefer cash, but it should be the choice of the business owner, not the Legislature.

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Dave Hinz, Clearwater

Leaf blowers, be gone

St. Pete Pier

The St. Pete Pier is noisy and smelly, and I’m not talking about the parrots or joyful kids on the playground. There are too many internal combustion vehicles and devices in operation, generating noise and harmful exhaust (these are not subject to pollution regulations that govern autos). Even the tram has an engine generating noise and fumes. I was walking about 50 feet away from a backpack-mounted, gas-powered leaf blower and the fumes made me cough. I can’t imagine what it does to the lungs of the worker wearing it. The Pier, and most city parks, should almost entirely use battery vehicles and devices, perhaps with an exception for periodic cutting of large grassy areas. It seems retrograde to have a prime spot for recreating on the bay subject to foul air.

Fred DeSapio, St. Petersburg

My two reactions

Failing the smell test | Letter, Jan. 3

I agree with the letter writer who expressed upset over the whole ordeal with President Claudine Gay of Harvard. I, too, am Jewish. I had two reactions to the way these college presidents were addressed. First, the whole circus act reminded me of McCarthyism and the intimidation of normal people trying to do their jobs. And second, why didn’t the Republican congresswoman, who acted outraged at antisemitism, bring in Donald Trump and his “very good people” to be grilled on their antisemitic rhetoric?

Ann Jamieson, St. Petersburg