Advertisement
  1. Opinion

Editorial: Cases shine a light into Scientology

The judges in two separate lawsuits against the Church of Scientology have made the right call to keep the focus on the church’s behavior and reject its efforts to sidetrack the cases. The church should address the accusations of misconduct directly rather than delay and obfuscate by trying to force its accusers to change lawyers.
Published Oct. 4, 2013

The judges in two separate lawsuits against the Church of Scientology have made the right call to keep the focus on the church's behavior and reject its efforts to sidetrack the cases. The church should address the accusations of misconduct directly rather than delay and obfuscate by trying to force its accusers to change lawyers.

Judges in Tampa and Texas this week properly rejected the church's attempt to force the plaintiffs' lawyers off the cases, which would have stalled the lawsuits and made it difficult for the church's critics to proceed. In Tampa, U.S. District Judge James D. Whittemore ruled that two South Florida lawyers can continue to represent a California couple who accuse the church of fraud. In Texas, a state court judge rejected the church's argument to remove lawyers representing the wife of a former high-ranking church officer who has accused the church of harassment.

The lawsuits go to the heart of some of the most serious accusations against the Church of Scientology. One involves onetime devoted church members who generously contributed to the church. The other involves the family of a former high-ranking staff member who joined former Scientology colleagues in describing in a series of articles in the Tampa Bay Times how the church mistreated staffers, intimidated them and tracked down those who left. The lawsuits could shed further light on the church's activities, so it is no surprise Scientology lawyers are distracting the courts with side issues.

The church continues to operate in unpredictable ways under a cloud of secrecy. In August, in defiance of the city of Clearwater's warning, it cut down two large trees near its downtown headquarters to clear space for a November event and was fined $2,000. This weekend it expected to draw thousands of Scientologists to Clearwater for the opening of its enormous Flag Building, which has been under construction for almost 15 years. That event was abruptly canceled last month without explanation. Without comment, the church also paid $3 million for part of a key city block that had long been considered by Clearwater officials as a key factor in redevelopment.

The Tampa lawsuit could shed more light on how the Church of Scientology raises and spends money. Rocio and Luis Garcia of California accuse the church of fraud and argue the church used deceptive, high-pressure pitches to get them and other Scientologists to donate millions. The Garcias donated more than $420,000 to the Flag Building and claim the church deceptively raised millions more than was needed to build the enormous project.

The Church of Scientology has consistently insisted its fundraising practices and its treatment of its staff are aboveboard and legal. If that is true, then it should instruct its lawyers to drop their stalling tactics and directly address the merits of the legal claims against the church that paint a far different picture.

ALSO IN THIS SECTION

  1. Two people use a pedestrian crosswalk on Fowler Avenue at 22nd Street in Tampa. LUIS SANTANA   |   TIMES
    Here’s what readers had to say in Tuesday’s letters to the editor.
  2. Hernando County community news Tara McCarty
  3. Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, arrives at the Capitol to review transcripts of his earlier testimony in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump, in Washington, Monday, Oct. 28, 2019. J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE  |  AP
    The president’s personal pick as ambassador to the European Union all of a sudden could recall conversations that he’d previously claimed didn’t happen, writes columnist Carl Hiaasen.
  4. A replica of the Dali bronze statue: Terpsicore (Muse of Dance), can be seen with other sculptures outside the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg. SCOTT KEELER | Times SCOTT KEELER  |   Times
    The Pinellas County Commission should embrace the museum’s request for bed tax money to pay for half of a major expansion project.
  5. Hernando County community news Tara McCarty
  6. A crowd gathers to watch the annual Veterans Day parade and classic car show hosted by and held at the James A. Haley Veteran's Hospital and Clinics in Tampa.
    The nation owes an enduring debt to its service men and women.
  7. In this March 23, 2019 photo, a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max aircraft lands at the Southern California Logistics Airport in the high desert town of Victorville, Calif. MATT HARTMAN  |  AP
    Monday’s letters to the editor
  8. Leonard Pitts undefined
    Leonard Pitts provides an action plan to make sure your vote counts.
  9. The West Front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington. J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE  |  AP
    Here’s some interesting commentary from the opposite poles of the political spectrum.
  10. $100 dollar bills with Benjamin Franklin's face SVETLANA KUZNETSOVA  |  Tampa Tribune
    Here’s what readers had to say in Sunday’s letters to the editor.
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement