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Hillsborough school leaders need to step up | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Saturday’s letters to the editor.
Hillsborough County Public Schools Superintendent Addison Davis addresses members of the School Board at a retreat on April 19. Shown, to his right, are members Jessica Vaughn and Stacy Hahn. In the background is Chief Communications Officer Tanya Arja.
Hillsborough County Public Schools Superintendent Addison Davis addresses members of the School Board at a retreat on April 19. Shown, to his right, are members Jessica Vaughn and Stacy Hahn. In the background is Chief Communications Officer Tanya Arja. [ MARLENE SOKOL | Times staff ]
Published Apr. 24

Do your job

Is the Hillsborough school board about to make its financial crisis worse? | Editorial, April 22

The Hillsborough School Board yet again fails to perform. The budget shortfall was well known long before the new superintendent started. The board knew cuts would have to come and Superintendent Addison Davis made the tough decision — very hard I know, as I have had to do it. Now the “courageous” board has made him the scapegoat for its failure to act. The members were elected and are paid to make tough and fiscally responsible decisions. To date, they have failed miserably.

Ross P. Alander, Tampa

Collect all the taxes

The $1 trillion tax evasion opportunity | Column, April 23

The Internal Revenue Service commissioner reports that if he had adequate staff, the IRS could collect an additional $1 trillion a year in uncollected taxes and help lower federal deficits and debts. The IRS staff has experienced a massive staff decline over the years. The situation is untenable because the IRS is tasked with managing all the major COVID relief legislation, which is a huge job. The IRS has the responsibility for dealing with tax and relief fraud, cheating and underreporting of income.

All of us who pay taxes should be concerned with cheaters especially wealthy taxpayers. The time is ripe to equip the IRS to be staffed to check cheaters, both individuals and businesses.

James Gillespie, St. Petersburg

Go after tax cheats

The $1 trillion tax evasion opportunity | Column, April 23

William A. Galston makes a valid point. The federal government doesn’t really need to increase taxes on wealthy individuals and corporations, it needs to increase enforcement on taxes already owed by high-end tax cheats. No one likes being audited, but Americans hate seeing tax cheats get away with stealing even more. That’s the American people’s money, and not going after tax cheats is a dereliction of good governance. The current administration should support the IRS and get our money from rich crooks and tax cheats.

Brian Valsavage, St. Petersburg

Whiteness is not a cancer

For white Americans, a time to listen | April 22

I listen when it’s time to learn. I speak when it’s time to say something. There is nothing complex about this issue. Since I had nothing to do, nor have I ever had anything to do with anything like this, I will not listen to you, or any “protesters” calling “whiteness” a cancer on the world. The time has come for the media to end the reflexive “white lives do not matter because Black lives have ever been wronged.” Justice is individual. Assigning victim status, or perpetrator status to blocks of people is not only lazy and purely political, but it’s also a fallacy. In the real world, we all get along pretty well.

Jason Barrera, Oldsmar

Pro sports too left wing

MLB moves All-Star Game from Atlanta in response to voting restrictions | April 2

New York Yankees legend Mickey Mantle once said that “a team is where a boy can prove his courage on his own. A gang is where a coward goes to hide.” Professional sports in America have been hijacked by radical left-wing activists and the woke movement. I have had nothing to do with them since players began refusing to stand for the flag and our national anthem. As a career soldier, I fought for their right to protest and for my right to boycott professional sports. If you think that the Mick or that Willie Mays or Hank Aaron would have refused to stand and show respect for their country and their flag, then like many people today, you don’t know your history.

What used to be team sports has now become one big gang and, as for me, I want nothing to do with any of it.

Charles Sitero, Ormond Beach