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Limiting health insurance for COVID anti-vaxxers could push them toward the jab | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Wednesday’s letters to the editor.
Christiana Neri, 38, holds her 13-year-old son, Ivan Hernandez, as Sequoia Hutton administers Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a mobile vaccine clinic held for age 12 and over in Los Angeles on Friday.
Christiana Neri, 38, holds her 13-year-old son, Ivan Hernandez, as Sequoia Hutton administers Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a mobile vaccine clinic held for age 12 and over in Los Angeles on Friday. [ IRFAN KHAN | Los Angeles Times ]
Published May 19
Updated May 19

No shot, no coverage

A turning point for Florida and the nation in the fight against COVID-19 | Editorial, May 18

I’m surprised that health insurance companies haven’t weighed in on the subject of people refusing the COVID-19 vaccine. If they limited hospital coverage for people who had the opportunity to get a shot but refused it without a medical reason, it could motivate more people to get the vaccine.

Cheri LaBelle, St. Petersburg

Taking too much credit

How Florida’s school choice programs create good citizens | Column, May 18

John Legg offers his interpretation of studies that support private school choice programs. Half of the studies say student performance improved, but he doesn’t offer a metric. He also doesn’t really address what happens to districts where charter schools siphon the best students with engaged parents from failing schools, taking precious resources with them. But he conflates the creation of charter schools with magnet programs. He ignores the nefarious ways by which some districts now disregard from their calculations of graduation rates the students who move. He ignores the creation of voluntary pre-kindergarten. He claims private schools have gotten “far more diverse” but offers no detail. This column takes far too much credit and offers far too many hand-picked numbers. Sorry, I don’t buy it.

Steve Geiger, St. Petersburg

Keep yard waste out of storm drains

Timely tendings seasonal fertilizer restrictions begin June 1 in Pinellas | May 16

This article mentions that “yard waste may not ever be swept or blown into stormwater drains, ditches, roads, etc.,” because it’s a violation of local ordinances. Well, my observation over the years is that lawn care companies consistently do this in many communities. Maybe the ordinance needs to be enforced to improve our water quality.

Kenneth Muzyk, Brandon

Republicans today

House GOP elects Trump defender Elise Stefanik to No. 3 post | May 14

What has become of the Republican Party that I supported for 30 years? To be a Republican today, must one must deny science? And now, must one must deny arithmetic (as in counting votes)? Sorry, I can’t go there.

Charles Lehnert, Sun City Center

Protect the child after birth

Supreme Court to weigh rollback of abortion rights | May 17

Why is it okay for people to say they are against abortion but at the same time vote against feeding, clothing, educating and providing health care to these very babies? It’s not that every pregnancy must go on; it’s that every child from said pregnancy must be cared for. How can you have one without the other?

Tobey Burwick, Dunedin