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Wear your vaccine card proudly around your neck | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Monday’s letters to the editor.
Receptionist Maribel Hidalgo displays her vaccination card after receiving the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon earlier this year.
Receptionist Maribel Hidalgo displays her vaccination card after receiving the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon earlier this year. [ BROOKE HERBERT | Brooke Herbert ]
Published May 24

Wear it proudly

The passport we need | May 21, Washington Post editorial

Let’s start a peaceful movement. In solidarity over the importance of getting the public vaccinated, those of us who can get inoculated should do this: When out in public, let’s wear our vaccination cards enclosed in a plastic see-through ID tag sleeve on a lanyard around our necks. Then, when you see another person wearing one, smile, nod gratefully or give her a thumbs up. Consider it a service to bring public health awareness of vaccine participation. Let’s use lanyards of different colors and patterns and make this fun. Do not under any circumstances present yourself as morally superior or make judgments about a person’s lack of tag to question their vaccination status. If anyone confronts you with a negative attitude, sincerely say “peace be with you.” Then be on your way. If by chance your tag prompts sincere inquiries or interest, be open to that opportunity to connect.

A. O’Brien, Pinellas Park

History, in code

For students learning American history, what does just ‘the facts’ mean? | Editorial, May 21

Florida Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran says, “You can’t go back and rewrite history.” But historians are doing just that every day. He wants teachers to ”be fair and … truthful, and follow the standards,” which are defined as a “traditional view of American history.” Those are code words for history from the perspective of white men. How can teachers be truthful and follow the standards when the standards are biased and not truthful?

Stephen Feldman, Apollo Beach

Just carry it

The passport we need | May 21, Washington Post editorial

I do not understand the fuss about carrying vaccine “passports.” It is simple. We are required to carry driver licenses, proof of car insurance, medical insurance cards and identification for bank transactions. I laminated my vaccination card and carry it with me.

John Tischner III, Dunedin

A woman’s choice

The Supreme Court is coming for Roe | Column, May 23

Let me get this straight. The decision whether or not to get a COVID-19 vaccine should be a personal decision, between you and your doctor, and the government should not have a role in that decision, even though the decision not to be inoculated has an effect on society as a whole. But the decision to get an abortion should be decided by the government, mostly by men, who are not the ones undergoing the procedure or bearing the consequences. That decision affects only the woman, and if she chooses, her partner.

Lois Lane, St. Petersburg