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COVID remains a threat. Look no further than what happened at the Manatee government center | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Monday’s letters to the editor.
Syringes prepped with Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.
Syringes prepped with Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine.
Published Jun. 28

COVID’s long term consequences

‘Long COVID’ may help us understand other chronic diseases | June 24

Thank you for your continuing coverage on COVID-19. We are not out of the “viral woods” yet. As mentioned in your article on “long haulers”, this affects up to 30 percent of those who contract the virus, with multiple organs affected. Besides all of those mentioned in the article, one common manifestation is loss of taste and smell. Imagine wine or beer tasting like water, and steak or other favorite foods tasting like rubber. That’s exactly how some of my patients have described their post COVID symptoms many months after being infected. In some people, this loss may be permanent.

We have to remain vigilant, as evidenced by the COVID outbreak this month at the Manatee government building where five people contracted the virus, four were hospitalized, and two died. None of those people were vaccinated. One person who also worked in the same IT department and was exposed to these others was symptom free. That person was vaccinated. Some children can also get very sick with “multi-system inflammatory syndrome in children,” including severe heart conditions.

The choice is clear. A shot or two (of the vaccine) is a small measure to take to avoid tragic results in both adults and in children. The scientific data is also clear: The risk of contracting COVID and getting very sick, or worse, far outweighs any very small risk of the vaccine.

Dr. Charles Sand, Tampa

The writer is medical adviser for the Hillsborough County/Tampa COVID-19 Committee and serves on the Hillsborough Emergency Medical Planning Council.

Going too far

State university faculty, students to be surveyed on beliefs| June 22

Our governor wants to take a survey of the political leanings of Florida college professors (there’s really no other way to phrase it). It’s an ideological purity test, plain and simple. “There are 203 leftist professors in Florida colleges!” survey leader Joe McCarthy says.

So much for a well-rounded education. This is another in a long line of attempts to stifle opinion and create a generation of conservative voters who, because of an absence of diversity, know no other way.

John Ways, South Pasadena