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As COVID changes, we must adapt, too | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Friday’s letters to the editor.
Top infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci responds to accusations by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., as he testifies before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 20, 2021. Cases of COVID-19 have tripled over the past three weeks, and hospitalizations and deaths are rising among unvaccinated people. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, Pool)
Top infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci responds to accusations by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., as he testifies before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 20, 2021. Cases of COVID-19 have tripled over the past three weeks, and hospitalizations and deaths are rising among unvaccinated people. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, Pool) [ J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE | AP ]
Published Jul. 30

Not yesterday’s coronavirus

CDC reverses course on indoor masks in Florida, other parts of U.S. | July 28

There are no mixed messages from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Today’s coronavirus is not the same virus we were fighting three months ago. The CDC recommendations are based on what we know today, not on what we knew yesterday, last week or last year. We need to be “Fauci’d” every day to get medical facts, not political rhetoric. The virus has learned how to evolve. We should be so smart.

Carl Zielonka, Tampa

No jab, no coverage

Florida tops 16,000 COVID cases Tuesday, highest daily new cases since January | July 29

Every day, we see the news about the increasing cases of the delta variant — and the stories of people who refuse to be vaccinated even though the vaccines have proven effective. The reasons for refusing vary from fear of side effects to political reasons to some form of freedom of choice guaranteed by the Constitution. These unvaccinated people certainly have a right to their opinion and their choices. But they do not have a right to endanger other people such as hospital workers, family and retail staff. To encourage these people to get vaccinated, I suggest health insurance companies discontinue coverage of this disease for unvaccinated people. The companies should give their subscribers a reasonable amount of time to obtain a vaccination after which they will no longer provide coverage. Proof of vaccination should be provided at time of hospital admission. Exemptions could be made for people with religious or medical conflicts. These should be registered with the insurance company in advance.

Barry Kreiling, Brooksville

Read the sign

Hillsborough vaccinations plummet, experts fear September COVID wave | July 28

It’s funny how as a ride-share driver I have conversations with some passengers about COVID. They ask if they still have to wear a mask even though I have signs all over the car that state, “Yes, you do.” I tell them I got the shot, and some say there is no way they are putting a foreign subject in their body — as I drive them to the kratom store, smoke shop or bar. Duh!

Nancy Salisbury, Largo

Science changes

CDC reverses course on indoor masks in Florida, other parts of U.S. | July 28

For the life of me I cannot understand why some people go berserk when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changes its guidelines. Its job is to care for the health of this country, not play politics. Science changes, and the CDC has been doing the best it can to keep up with the changing scientific data of this virus.

Beverly Isaacs, Seminole

Pro-choice

It’s my call | Letter, July 29

The people who are using the excuse that it is “my body, my choice” when it comes to the COVID vaccine should remember that next time they attend an anti-abortion rally or vote based solely on a candidates anti-abortion stance, regardless of that candidate’s other policy ideas. The idea that wearing a mask infringes on people’s personal liberties and offends them is mind-boggling when it comes from the same people who want to tell women what they can and cannot do with their bodies when it comes to reproductive health.

Holly Wilke, Port Richey

Support the Rays

Rays come up short, lose to Yankees in extra innings | July 29

Wednesday night I attended the Rays/Yanks game. I’m a fervent Yankee fan who moved to Tampa Bay four years ago. I was wondering why there seemed to be more Yankee fans in attendance for the 3-1 Yankee victory. Looking at the box score attendance afterward, I found a meager 11,500 fans or 46% of capacity at the game in a stadium that already had “reduced” seating with the closing of the upper deck. That stat lead me to check out the Rays’ season attendance to date.

The Rays, who are in contention for first place in the American League East, are 27th out of 30 teams in attendance. They are running at an average 7,600 fans, which is only 30% of capacity in attendance per game. The Rays actually draw a 13,000 average at away games! My question is, in an environment of debates of where and how big to build a new stadium, why should the Tampa/St. Pete politicians be even supporting a new stadium in light of the dismal fan support? To the absent Rays fans, you need to step up your support. You don’t deserve a new stadium anywhere until you show stronger support in person. Sporting TB hats, jerseys and other fan garb is nice, but real fan support is reflected by attendance at games.

Ernest Vogt, Dunedin