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We’re killing ourselves whether quickly or slowly | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Monday’s letters to the editor.
Two Chinese SU-30 fighter jets take off from an unspecified location to fly a patrol over the South China Sea. China flew more than 30 military planes, including SU-30 fighter jets, toward Taiwan on Oct. 3, 2021, the second large display of force in as many days.(Jin Danhua/Xinhua via AP, File)
Two Chinese SU-30 fighter jets take off from an unspecified location to fly a patrol over the South China Sea. China flew more than 30 military planes, including SU-30 fighter jets, toward Taiwan on Oct. 3, 2021, the second large display of force in as many days.(Jin Danhua/Xinhua via AP, File) [ JIN DANHUA | AP ]
Published Oct. 11

One way or another

Quick or slow death of the planet

As China ramps up the potential for armed conflict, and Congress continues to pretend we’re not at a ruinous tipping point environmentally, I have come to a heavy-hearted realization: We can die quickly from nuclear or chemical or any of the other forms of war we’ve invented, or we can die slowly from global warming.

Either way, we’re on the road to killing ourselves and all other species on the planet. And either way as stewards of this planet, we are on the verge of blowing it. So, whether countries ramp up their warring capabilities, or Congress continues its anemic response to our climate disaster, humanity has shown its lack of ability to even adequately sustain, let alone improve life and the world on which it lives. At this point, it may just boil down to which way we want to end our reign.

Terri Benincasa, Palm Harbor

State will find a way

State overpaid benefits | Oct. 7

Although Florida’s state governance has shown itself to be woefully callous and incompetent at procuring and distributing federal funds to aid its most vulnerable citizens during the pandemic, it would hardly be a surprise if that same governing force proved quite skilled at going after those same citizens if it perceived they did not meet the state’s convoluted requirements for receiving any federal or state aid.

Brian Valsavage, St. Petersburg

Surprised at the surprise

You can’t fix Facebook | Column, Oct. 10

I am shocked that people are shocked that Facebook put profit before people’s welfare. This is not abnormal business behavior. This is normal business practice. Energy companies have known since the 1950s that they were causing global warming. Their response: fake research to muddy the waters. Tobacco companies knew their product killed people. Their response was also fake research to muddy the waters. Coal mine owners ignored safety rules for their workers and left huge environmental problems for the public to clean up after they closed a mine and frequently used bankruptcy to avoid responsibility. Ford knew about the Pinto fire problem but figured it would spend less in wrongful death lawsuits than if they had a recall. Banks and other financial institutes went crazy with loans in the early 2000s figuring they were too big to fail. These are just a few examples.

Christopher Radulich, Apollo Beach

Furl those flags

Keep politics off the water

On any given day, when my husband and I are out on our boat, we enjoy our beautiful Gulf of Mexico and bays to get away from it all. There are many other boaters with families‚ with little children‚ with large groups on pontoons and with tourists on ferries doing the same. I find it very offensive that some boaters continue to fly political flags.

Just recently, we saw several large flags that said “F--k Biden,” “Trump Won,” “Don’t Tread On Me,” “Trump 2024.” People are welcome to their opinion. But I think it would courteous for political flag-flying boaters to divorce themselves from politics during their time on the water. Please allow the rest of us to relax, to bathe in the whispering salt waters, to enjoy the sounds of the birds and to hear the children playing in the surf and sand.

Susan Kaineg, Seminole