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For Tampa Bay Rays, ‘joy’ is sadly not a metric | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Sunday’s letters to the editor.
Tampa Bay Rays' Ji-Man Choi, right, celebrates his sixth-inning solo home run against the Boston Red Sox with Brett Phillips during Game 2 of their American League Division Series Friday at Tropicana Field.
Tampa Bay Rays' Ji-Man Choi, right, celebrates his sixth-inning solo home run against the Boston Red Sox with Brett Phillips during Game 2 of their American League Division Series Friday at Tropicana Field. [ CHRIS O'MEARA | AP ]
Published Oct. 17

The joy is gone

Proud, disappointed Rays ponder how to take the next step | Oct. 12

As the Tampa Bay Rays ponder how and why they lost their postseason matchup with Boston, I hope they consider the role of joy in playing baseball. After watching many games during the regular season, it was apparent that joyful energy was at the heart of their many high-scoring wins. He was not alone in this, but the player who epitomized that joy for me was Brett Phillips, the man who could crush a home run, wing his way around the bases and gush about how much fun baseball is in post-game interviews. That joy seemed infectious, providing the spark for his teammates to follow up by crushing more hits and homers. The dry statistical approach that left Phillips off the post-season roster was both an affront to him and a lead weight for his team. The joy was gone, and so were the winning ways.

Matthew Brockmeier, Random Lake, Wisconsin

We need speed cameras

Dangerous Tampa Bay traffice

As an Uber driver driving around Tampa Bay all day I find that the majority of drivers feel there are no speed limits. We have red-light cameras at certain intersections, so why haven’t we created speed trap cameras? Speeders are a huge and constant problem. I drive around 5 miles over the speed limit when possible, but others blow right by me as if I were standing still. This is a scary situation for both me and my passengers. If there were speed cameras around, you could get a ticket in the mail. This might help with this dangerous driving problem, and it would free up the police for other work like controlling gun violence.

Nancy Salisbury, Largo