Advertisement
What the COVID vaccine does and doesn’t do | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Wednesday’s letters to the editor.
Marcia Myers, 90, receives a booster shot of the Pfizer vaccination from Kara Dandrea with Guardian Pharmacy at the Toby& Leon Cooperman Sinai Residences in Boca Raton.
Marcia Myers, 90, receives a booster shot of the Pfizer vaccination from Kara Dandrea with Guardian Pharmacy at the Toby& Leon Cooperman Sinai Residences in Boca Raton. [ MIKE STOCKER | Sun Sentinel ]
Published Nov. 24

Staying alive

Coming to terms with COVID realities | Column, Nov. 22

Perhaps the clearest statement on why Americans should get a COVID vaccination came in a recent Wall Street Journal article headlined “U.S. COVID-19 deaths in 2021 Surpass 2020′s.” There, Abraar Karan, an infectious-diseases doctor at Stanford University, pointed out that “public-health officials failed to effectively communicate that the purpose of vaccines is to protect against severe cases of COVID-19, rather than to prevent the spread of infection entirely.” Underplaying the real purpose for the vaccine likely led to much doubt over the vaccine’s benefits. Dr. Karan also related that the nation’s testing has been used ineffectively. All that science defeated by poor communication.

Gregory Matthews, St. Petersburg

Leading is hard work

Biden signs $1 trillion infrastructure bill | Nov. 16

I know it’s hard for his supporters to accept, but former President Donald Trump was too lazy to do the hard work it takes to be president. He still thought he was still in real estate where you sell the sizzle, not the steak, but being president is hard work. We just saw it with President Joe Biden getting the infrastructure bill passed. It took months of hard work bringing people together and coming up with compromises to get it done. Trump bragged during his campaign he was a great builder and was going to “rebuild America,” but it never got off the ground because he was unwilling to do the hard work.

Joseph Marra, Venice

Gun safety

Atlanta airport checkpoint chaos: Man grabs gun, it goes off | Nov. 21

This weekend, a loaded firearm was again discovered during screening at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. This time it was discharged, luckily no one was harmed by the bullet. “Across the nation, the (Transportation Security Administration) said, it had stopped 4,495 airline passengers from carrying firearms onto their flights by Oct. 3 of this year,” the AP reported, adding that, “Of the guns confiscated at airport security checkpoints across the nation last year, about 83% were loaded.” This is far too many people not being aware of their weapon’s status (location, loaded/unloaded, locked/unlocked). Gun owners who cannot safely handle their weapons should not be allowed to possess them. No exceptions.

David Blauch, Lutz