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I don’t miss that America at all | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Tuesday’s letters to the editor.
Equal rights — whether for women, people or color or many other groups — weren't what they are today. Here, U.S. deputy marshals escort 6-year-old Ruby Bridges from William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, La., in November 1960.  The first-grader was the only black child enrolled in the school, where parents of white students boycotted the court-ordered integration law and took their children out of school. [Associated Press]
Equal rights — whether for women, people or color or many other groups — weren't what they are today. Here, U.S. deputy marshals escort 6-year-old Ruby Bridges from William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans, La., in November 1960. The first-grader was the only black child enrolled in the school, where parents of white students boycotted the court-ordered integration law and took their children out of school. [Associated Press]
Published Nov. 30, 2021

The bad old days

Not missing that America

While driving the other day, I spotted a sign in someone’s yard that said, “I miss the America I grew up in.” That statement had me reflecting on the America I grew up in. It was the early ‘70s when I applied for my first credit card. I was a newlywed whose husband had lost his job due to a prolonged strike that caused the company to close permanently. My job at the bank was secure at the time, so I applied for the card in my name. When the card came in the mail, it had only my husband’s name on it. Another memory I have: My sister-in-law let it slip to a co-worker that she might be pregnant. The manager of the bank where she worked promptly fired her. Thankfully, this young nation is continually putting laws in place to protect those with less power.

Anita Glock, Tampa

Some example

America is sick with information disorder | A Washington Post editorial, Nov. 29

So a Washington Post editorial says that “America is sick with information disorder. It’s about time we came up with a cure for this malady.” This is a case of the Post Editorial Board saying, “Do as I say, not as I do.”

James Wisner, Tampa

Repeat offender

Driver struck man at 83 mph | Nov. 27

“Repeat offender” probably conjures up many different images to many different people. It’s highly doubtful, though, that one of them is of an affluent, talented surgeon with an immature need for speed who’s had several charges dismissed and has taken as many safe driving classes as the law allows to avoid getting points on his driving record. Now there’s a deceased triathlete who was out for a training ride and, quite likely, a ruined career for a speeding surgeon.

Paul Cooper, St. Petersburg

It’s dangerous

5 wheelchair deaths in 6 weeks reveal danger | Nov. 26

I lived outside of Chicago for many years before moving here. I used to think that Chicago was a dangerous place because there was a greater chance of getting shot there as opposed to Tampa Bay. I have now realized that Tampa Bay is just as dangerous with the difference being that here the chances of getting hit by a poor driver are much greater. Just a casual observation based on what I read in the paper.

Dave Hinz, Clearwater