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My Republican friends don’t think like that | Letters
Here’s what readers are saying in Friday’s letters to the editor.
Fencing in seen along the western front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 6, 2022. A year after the Jan. 6 attack, Congress is more deeply divided than ever, and it shows in how lawmakers are choosing to mark the day. Some members planned a moment of silence. Others spent the day educating Americans on the workings of democracy. And still others don't think the deadly siege on Congress needs to be remembered at all. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Fencing in seen along the western front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 6, 2022. A year after the Jan. 6 attack, Congress is more deeply divided than ever, and it shows in how lawmakers are choosing to mark the day. Some members planned a moment of silence. Others spent the day educating Americans on the workings of democracy. And still others don't think the deadly siege on Congress needs to be remembered at all. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) [ CAROLYN KASTER | AP ]
Published Jan. 7

Not my friends

Fla. leads nation in riot arrests | Jan. 6

I have about 50 people whom I call close friends, relatives and co-workers. From conversations and actual confirmation, I consider about 80 percent to be Republicans (from staunch to moderate) and the remainder to be Democrats (again, from staunch to moderate). I would say about 50 to 60 percent of all of them are fed up with the fighting and name-calling and inability to put aside one’s own political and social beliefs and concentrate on the good of all Americans. You will read every day that about 70 percent of Republicans believe the election was stolen and that a majority (52 percent, per one poll) support the horrible events of Jan. 6, 2021. Hmm. None — and I mean none — of those in my group who are Republican feel this way. I guess I only associate with the best of the Republicans.

Tom Craig, Riverview

One person, one vote

What if it can happen here? | Column, Jan. 6

There is a simple and elegant solution to help clear up our current state of political unrest: Do away with the Electoral College. We have been dealing with this flawed voting system for more than two centuries with four instances where the “winner” received fewer votes than the “loser.” The two most recent were George W. Bush in 2000 and Donald Trump in 2016. Almost none of the Founding Fathers’ assumptions about the electoral system proved true. Now the popularity of the Electoral College has hovered between 35 and 44 percent in the 21st century. Critics argue that the Electoral College is less democratic than a national direct popular vote and is subject to manipulation because of faithless electors. Individual citizens in less populated states have proportionately more voting power than those in more populous states. It’s time to replace it with a true democratic principle: “one person, one vote.”

George Chase, St. Pete Beach

One bad thing

UF’s Fuchs to step down | Jan. 6

Many years ago, I learned a lot of life lessons as a young Infantry officer. It looks like UF President Kent Fuchs is learning one of those life lessons: “One ‘oh, crap’ wipes out a lot of ‘atta boys.’ ” (Translation: One mistake ruins many good works.) History will show us how good of a president Fuchs was. As far as Gov. Ron DeSantis back channel university trustee Mori Hosseini goes, I don’t think we need to wait on history. That picture is crystal clear.

Terrence Callahan, Crystal Beach

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