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Florida’s investigation of College Football Playoff enters next phase

The Attorney General’s Office is continuing its antitrust investigation of the Texas-based group.
 
The College Football Playoff has sent documents to the Florida Attorney General's Office as part of an antitrust investigation.
The College Football Playoff has sent documents to the Florida Attorney General's Office as part of an antitrust investigation. [ TONY GUTIERREZ | AP (2014) ]
Published Jan. 18|Updated Jan. 19

The Florida Attorney General’s antitrust investigation into the College Football Playoff and its snub of Florida State has reached its next phase.

The CFP sent at least some documents to Ashley Moody’s office ahead of Wednesday’s deadline. That information is now under “active review” by the Attorney General’s Office, press secretary Chase Sizemore said.

The CFP is still “in the process of producing information,” said Brett Daniels, the group’s senior director of communication and branding. He declined to comment further.

This update stems from the CFP selection committee’s decision to pick one-loss Alabama ahead of 13-0 FSU for the fourth and final spot in the four-team field.

A week and a half later, Moody began an investigation into the Texas-based group that manages the playoff about “possible contracts, combinations, or conspiracies ... relating to anticompetitive effects.” She sent a civil investigative demand — essentially a subpoena for civil cases that still has court power behind it — for information and documents related to the voting. Those included internal communications about conferences and the composition of major bowls and the playoff as well as individual and collective votes and notes.

She also asked for communications about “the availability of ‘key players and coaches’” — a sticking point for the Seminoles because of star quarterback Jordan Travis’ season-ending injury.

The Attorney General’s deadline originally was Jan. 11 but was moved back based on when the CFP was served the investigative demand.

This case is separate from the other massive, FSU-related legal issue: the Seminoles’ pursuit of a potential exit strategy from the ACC (and the conference’s fight against it).

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