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Bucs unveil new replay system, among other Raymond James Stadium improvements

A new Intel True View replay system will highlight changes the team will bring to the stadium this year.
The Bucs will debut the Intel True View replay system later this season, at Raymond James Stadium a demonstration played on the jumbotron on Thursday. [MONICA HERNDON | Times]
Published Sep. 5
Updated Sep. 6

TAMPA — As the Bucs prepare for week one of the regular season, team brass highlighted renovations at Raymond James Stadium on Thursday, showing off a new in-stadium replay technology to be implemented this November.

Brian Ford, the Bucs chief operating officer, touted the team’s No. 1 ranking in fan technology, a designation the NFL bestowed on Tampa Bay each of the last two seasons. He said the new Intel True View replay system, using 38 5K ultra-high definition cameras to provide 360-degree views of plays at Raymond James, will help to keep the Bucs atop the league in fan technology.

“It’s going to be phenomenal," Ford said. “It’s going to provide better than what you have at home on your TV.”

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Approximately a third of NFL stadiums feature the Intel True View replay system, including Atlanta’s Mercedes Benz Stadium that opened last year. On Thursday, the team showed 360-degree replay footage from Atlanta’s stadium on the Raymond James video boards, providing a preview of how similar replays will look when the system goes live later this year.

“We’re trying to bring the at-home experience here but in person, which is always better,” Ford said.

The 5K Cameras have not yet been installed at Raymond James, but the Bucs hope to have the system ready by Nov. 10 when they return to Tampa to face the Cardinals after playing five straight games away from home.

The video replay from the Intel True View system provides a video game feel of on-field action. A replay from the new system could begin with a camera angle behind the quarterback as he drops back to pass, then rotate round the field to an angle behind the wide receiver as he makes a catch.

The system will be used for drive recaps and halftime packages rather than instant replays. It is part of a league-wide push for advanced technology. It will not be used for replay reviews this season because it is not universal across the league, but that could change as every NFL stadium adopts the technology in the future.

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Fans at Raymond James will have access to exclusive replays and camera angles from the Intel True View system through the Bucs mobile app. A tab within the app will allow attendees to access replays and other game day information at Raymond James.

In addition to the new replay system, stadium improvements at Raymond James feature four new nursing stations, a partnership with Fanatics to take over the team store, a 2,400 square foot Nike Concept store within the team store, and new smaller team stores in the main concourse and at Bucs Beach outside the stadium.

“We can’t control what happens on the field,” Ford said. “We sure can control the game day experience.”

Bucs Preview 2019

A look ahead at Bruce Arians’ first year in Tampa Bay and a critical season for Jameis Winston and the Buccaneers.

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