What’s in the Florida Gators’ football contracts with FSU, Texas and Colorado

The Times obtained contracts for the upcoming series through a public-records request.
Colorado and Texas will be coming to Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in the coming years. (MONICA HERNDON | Times)
Colorado and Texas will be coming to Ben Hill Griffin Stadium in the coming years. (MONICA HERNDON | Times)
Published June 3

The biggest out-of-state, non-conference football series in recent Florida history begins with a bunch of legalese.

“Witnesseth that…” the contract between the Gators and Texas reads, “The said parties mutually agree to cause their respective varsity teams to meet in the city of Gainesville, in the State of Florida, on the 7th day of September, 2030 and then and there engage in a game of football (the Game).”

Aside from some unnecessarily complex words about two teams playing a game, here’s what else is in the recent football contracts UF has signed with Texas, Florida State and Colorado, which the Tampa Bay Times obtained through a public-records request:

Colorado (at UF in 2028, at Colorado in ’29)

The visiting team receives $400,000. Each visiting team gets 3,000 tickets for sale to the fans/band and 300 complimentary tickets. Mascots and cheerleaders get in free, which is nice. If one side pulls out of the deal, it owes the other $1.5 million per unplayed game.

Florida State (at UF in 2019 and ’21, at FSU in ’20 and ’22)

The visiting team receives $500,000. Each visiting team gets 6,000 tickets for sale, including 2,000 in the lower bowl. Tickets for the visitors’ bands must be purchased from that allotment, but mascots and cheerleaders get in free. There’s a $1.5 million buyout for pulling out of a game, too.

RELATED: Why did Florida and FSU need to announce a four-year series extension?

Texas (at UF in 2030, at Texas in ’31)

No cash payments in this deal. The visitor gets 3,000 tickets for sale (including for the band) and 300 complimentary tickets. The same $1.5 million fee per game applies if one side breaks the contract.

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